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January 2020

EPS Colloquium

  • Dustin Trail

    Dr. Dustin Trail is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. His research is mainly laboratory-based and seeks to understand: (i) the evolution of planetary magmas through time;(ii) the conditions of early Earth and implications for the inception of the biosphere;(iii) secular changes in the oxidation state of magmas and fluids, and the connection between the chemical state of the crust and mantle; and (iv)non-traditional mechanisms of isotope fractionation. More Information about Dr. Trail

    Dustin Trail

    Dr. Dustin Trail is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. His research is mainly laboratory-based and seeks to understand: (i) the evolution of planetary magmas through time;(ii) the conditions of early Earth and implications for the inception of the biosphere;(iii) secular changes in the oxidation state of magmas and fluids, and the connection between the chemical state of the crust and mantle; and (iv)non-traditional mechanisms of isotope fractionation. More Information about Dr. Trail

29 Jan
11:45 am - 12:45 pm
Wright Labs Auditorium
610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854

Environmental Sciences Seminar:
What Are Eddy Fluxes? Biological and Chemical Feedbacks from (and to) the Ocean

  • David Lindo-Atichati

    Dr. David Lindo-Atichati is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering and Environmental Science at the City University of New York. His work, in conjunction with an international network of collaborators, grapples with questions at the frontiers of physics, biology, and chemistry in the oceanic systems. He approaches these questions from a multidimensional perspective that includes theory, observation, and modeling. By weaving these three approaches together, his research program is specifically designed to understand the interactions between oceanic circulation, marine ecosystems, and marine pollutants. He rigorously tests predictions of the models he uses with observations collected in the ocean. This research involves marine instrumentation, advanced computational methods, and visualization tools to address fundamental questions at the interface of oceanography and environmental engineering. More Information about Dr. Lindo-Atichati

    David Lindo-Atichati

    Dr. David Lindo-Atichati is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering and Environmental Science at the City University of New York. His work, in conjunction with an international network of collaborators, grapples with questions at the frontiers of physics, biology, and chemistry in the oceanic systems. He approaches these questions from a multidimensional perspective that includes theory, observation, and modeling. By weaving these three approaches together, his research program is specifically designed to understand the interactions between oceanic circulation, marine ecosystems, and marine pollutants. He rigorously tests predictions of the models he uses with observations collected in the ocean. This research involves marine instrumentation, advanced computational methods, and visualization tools to address fundamental questions at the interface of oceanography and environmental engineering. More Information about Dr. Lindo-Atichati

Abstract:  Submesoscale and mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous and highly energetic rotating features of ocean circulation. Their influence on biological and biogeochemical processes stem not only from advective transport but also from the generation of variations in the environment, from the microscale to the mesoscale. A multidisciplinary ...
31 Jan
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Bldg. Room 223
14 College Farm Rd. New Brunswick, NJ 08901
February 2020

EPS Colloquium

  • Sean Kinney

    Sean Kinney is a Graduate Student in the Dept of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University. More Information about Sean

    Sean Kinney

    Sean Kinney is a Graduate Student in the Dept of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University. More Information about Sean

05 Feb
11:45 am - 12:45 pm
Wright Labs Auditorium
610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854

E&E Grad Program Seminar

  • Thomas Grothues

    Dr. Thomas Grothues is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. He is interested in the abundance and distribution of fishes as responses to physical factors. These responses include those that could be considered involuntary, such as distribution of larvae by ocean currents and mortality or loss of reproductive capacity in unsuitable environments. Responses also include those that are voluntary (behavioral), such as migration, ranging, and sheltering (including burial). The physical factors that he investigates as impacts include natural and anthropogenic perturbations such as restoration efforts, urbanization of water fronts, seasonal and inter-annual water quality fluctuations and ocean structure. Dr. Grothues is also a faculty member of EOAS.

    Thomas Grothues

    Dr. Thomas Grothues is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. He is interested in the abundance and distribution of fishes as responses to physical factors. These responses include those that could be considered involuntary, such as distribution of larvae by ocean currents and mortality or loss of reproductive capacity in unsuitable environments. Responses also include those that are voluntary (behavioral), such as migration, ranging, and sheltering (including burial). The physical factors that he investigates as impacts include natural and anthropogenic perturbations such as restoration efforts, urbanization of water fronts, seasonal and inter-annual water quality fluctuations and ocean structure. Dr. Grothues is also a faculty member of EOAS.

06 Feb
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Marine Sciences Building -- Alampi Room
71 Dudley Rd New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Environmental Sciences Seminar:
How Water Vapor Turns Ice into Liquid: Atmospheric River Impacts on Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Mass Balance

  • Kyle Mattingly

    Dr. Kyle Mattingly is a climate scientist whose primary research focus is on interactions between the atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans that control the evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. His past work has shown that episodes of intense atmospheric water vapor transport, known as atmospheric rivers, lead to increased melting of the ice sheet surface when they occur over Greenland during summer. He is currently working with a team of EOAS faculty mentors to assess the ability of global climate models to simulate atmospheric rivers and their coupled ocean-atmosphere drivers, with the goal of improving projections of future sea level rise from Greenland melt.

    Kyle completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Georgia and his B.S. in Meteorology at Western Kentucky University. In addition to his Greenland Ice Sheet research, he is interested in a number of other aspects of climate and its intersections with other earth system components. He has led or collaborated on research into the atmospheric circulation patterns controlling precipitation variability in subtropical South America, the effect of rain gauge network density on expected extreme precipitation return periods in the Colorado Front Range region, and the potential impact of ice sheet meltwater runoff on phytoplankton primary productivity in the Labrador Sea, among other topics. Kyle is a current EOAS Postdoctoral Awardee.

    Kyle Mattingly

    Dr. Kyle Mattingly is a climate scientist whose primary research focus is on interactions between the atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans that control the evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. His past work has shown that episodes of intense atmospheric water vapor transport, known as atmospheric rivers, lead to increased melting of the ice sheet surface when they occur over Greenland during summer. He is currently working with a team of EOAS faculty mentors to assess the ability of global climate models to simulate atmospheric rivers and their coupled ocean-atmosphere drivers, with the goal of improving projections of future sea level rise from Greenland melt.

    Kyle completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Georgia and his B.S. in Meteorology at Western Kentucky University. In addition to his Greenland Ice Sheet research, he is interested in a number of other aspects of climate and its intersections with other earth system components. He has led or collaborated on research into the atmospheric circulation patterns controlling precipitation variability in subtropical South America, the effect of rain gauge network density on expected extreme precipitation return periods in the Colorado Front Range region, and the potential impact of ice sheet meltwater runoff on phytoplankton primary productivity in the Labrador Sea, among other topics. Kyle is a current EOAS Postdoctoral Awardee.

Abstract:  Among the most pressing consequences of recent climate warming is the acceleration of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) since the late 1990s. Several episodes of widespread GrIS surface melt in recent years have coincided with intense poleward water vapor transport in narrow ...
07 Feb
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Bldg. Room 223
14 College Farm Rd. New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Geography Seminar:
Archiving a Wounded City: Kingston 2010

  • Deborah Thomas

    Dr. Deborah A. Thomas is the R. Jean Brownlee Professor of Anthropology, and the Director of the Center for Experimental Ethnography at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica and Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and The Politics of Culture in Jamaica, and is co-editor of the volume Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness. Her new book, Political Life in the Wake of the Plantation, will be published in November by Duke University Press. Thomas co-directed and co-produced the documentary films Bad Friday: Rastafari after Coral Gardens, and Four Days in May, and the experimental short film, Four Days in West Kingston. She is also the co-curator of a multi-media installation titled Bearing Witness: Four Days in West Kingston, which opened at the Penn Museum in November 2017. Thomas is the Editor-in-Chief of American Anthropologist, the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association. Prior to Thomas’s life as an academic, she was a professional dancer with the New York-based Urban Bush Women. More Information about Dr. Thomas

    Deborah Thomas

    Dr. Deborah A. Thomas is the R. Jean Brownlee Professor of Anthropology, and the Director of the Center for Experimental Ethnography at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica and Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and The Politics of Culture in Jamaica, and is co-editor of the volume Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness. Her new book, Political Life in the Wake of the Plantation, will be published in November by Duke University Press. Thomas co-directed and co-produced the documentary films Bad Friday: Rastafari after Coral Gardens, and Four Days in May, and the experimental short film, Four Days in West Kingston. She is also the co-curator of a multi-media installation titled Bearing Witness: Four Days in West Kingston, which opened at the Penn Museum in November 2017. Thomas is the Editor-in-Chief of American Anthropologist, the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association. Prior to Thomas’s life as an academic, she was a professional dancer with the New York-based Urban Bush Women. More Information about Dr. Thomas

Abstract: Anthropologist Don Robotham once dubbed Kingston a “wounded city,” in large part the result of the growth of urban colonial ghettos in the late 19thcentury and their transformation into garrison communities during the mid-20th.  Wounds can leave scars, material traces of violent encounters, but the effects ...
07 Feb
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Tillet Hall -- Room 246
53 Avenue E, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8040

EPS Colloquium

  • Jorge Lorenzo Trueba

    Dr. Jorge Lorenzo Trueba is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies at Montclair State University. One of his research goals is to understand how physical, biological processes, and the coupling between them, influence coastal dynamics. Another research objective of his is to understand how human activities affect coastal evolution, through both the accumulated effects of purposeful engineering activities and the unintentional consequences of land-use change. Using novel conceptual and computer models, integrated with field and experimental efforts, Dr. Trueba studies a variety of environments, including river deltas, marshes, coastal barriers, and mangroves. More Information about Dr. Trueba

    Jorge Lorenzo Trueba

    Dr. Jorge Lorenzo Trueba is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies at Montclair State University. One of his research goals is to understand how physical, biological processes, and the coupling between them, influence coastal dynamics. Another research objective of his is to understand how human activities affect coastal evolution, through both the accumulated effects of purposeful engineering activities and the unintentional consequences of land-use change. Using novel conceptual and computer models, integrated with field and experimental efforts, Dr. Trueba studies a variety of environments, including river deltas, marshes, coastal barriers, and mangroves. More Information about Dr. Trueba

12 Feb
11:45 am - 12:45 pm
Wright Labs Auditorium
610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854

E&E Grad Program Seminar:
Impact, Preference, and Performance of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) on Historic and Novel Hosts

  • Donnie Peterson

    Dr. Donnie Peterson is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources conducting research on early detection of forest insect pests with eDNA. His current project is early detection of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula). More Information about Dr. Peterson

    Donnie Peterson

    Dr. Donnie Peterson is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources conducting research on early detection of forest insect pests with eDNA. His current project is early detection of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula). More Information about Dr. Peterson

13 Feb
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Marine Sciences Building -- Alampi Room
71 Dudley Rd New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Geography Seminar

  • Robin Leichenko

    Dr. Robin Leichenko is Professor and Chair of Geography at Rutgers University and co-Director of the Rutgers Climate Institute. Her research explores economic vulnerability to climate change, equity implications of climate adaptation, and the interplay between climate extremes and urban spatial development. Leichenko has authored or co-authored two books and more than 70 journal articles and book chapters. Her book, Environmental Change and Globalization: Double Exposures (2008, Oxford University Press), won the Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Contribution from the Association of American Geographers. Leichenko served as a review editor for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report and as a contributing author on the IPCC Special Report on Extreme Events. Robin is also an EOAS faculty member. More Information about Dr. Leichenko

    Robin Leichenko

    Dr. Robin Leichenko is Professor and Chair of Geography at Rutgers University and co-Director of the Rutgers Climate Institute. Her research explores economic vulnerability to climate change, equity implications of climate adaptation, and the interplay between climate extremes and urban spatial development. Leichenko has authored or co-authored two books and more than 70 journal articles and book chapters. Her book, Environmental Change and Globalization: Double Exposures (2008, Oxford University Press), won the Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Contribution from the Association of American Geographers. Leichenko served as a review editor for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report and as a contributing author on the IPCC Special Report on Extreme Events. Robin is also an EOAS faculty member. More Information about Dr. Leichenko

14 Feb
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Tillet Hall -- Room 246
53 Avenue E, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8040

E&E Grad Program Seminar:
Prevalence of Synchrony Among Marine Fisheries and its Drivers

  • Joyce Ong

    Dr. Joyce Ong is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources. Dr. Ong is also a past EOAS Postdoctoral Program Awardee.

    Joyce Ong

    Dr. Joyce Ong is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources. Dr. Ong is also a past EOAS Postdoctoral Program Awardee.

20 Feb
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Marine Sciences Building -- Alampi Room
71 Dudley Rd New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Geography Seminar:
Book Talk: For the War Yet to Come: Planning Beirut’s Frontiers

  • Hiba Bou Akar

    Dr. Hiba Bou Akar is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University. Her research focuses on planning in conflict and post-conflict cities, the question of urban security and violence, and the role of religious political organizations in the making of cities. Bou Akar’s recent book, For the War Yet to Come: Planning Beirut’s Frontiers, published by Stanford University Press in 2018, examines how Beirut’s post-civil war peripheries have been transformed through multiple planning exercises into contested frontiers that are mired in new forms of conflict. It contributes to planning thought by studying planning practice within a framework of past and anticipated violence. Her first co-edited book, Narrating Beirut from its Borderlines, published by Heinrich Böll in 2011, incorporated ethnographic and archival research with art installations, architecture, graphic design, and photography to explore Beirut’s segregated geographies. Bou Akar’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), the Wenner- Gren Foundation, and the Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS). More Information about Dr. Bou Akar

    Hiba Bou Akar

    Dr. Hiba Bou Akar is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University. Her research focuses on planning in conflict and post-conflict cities, the question of urban security and violence, and the role of religious political organizations in the making of cities. Bou Akar’s recent book, For the War Yet to Come: Planning Beirut’s Frontiers, published by Stanford University Press in 2018, examines how Beirut’s post-civil war peripheries have been transformed through multiple planning exercises into contested frontiers that are mired in new forms of conflict. It contributes to planning thought by studying planning practice within a framework of past and anticipated violence. Her first co-edited book, Narrating Beirut from its Borderlines, published by Heinrich Böll in 2011, incorporated ethnographic and archival research with art installations, architecture, graphic design, and photography to explore Beirut’s segregated geographies. Bou Akar’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), the Wenner- Gren Foundation, and the Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS). More Information about Dr. Bou Akar

Book synopsis: Beirut is a city divided. Following the Green Line of the civil war, dividing the Christian east and the Muslim west, today hundreds of such lines dissect the city. For the residents of Beirut, urban planning could hold promise: a new spatial order could bring ...
21 Feb
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Tillet Hall -- Room 246
53 Avenue E, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8040
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