#EOAS in the News: Science Friday interviews Asa Rennermalm Today

#EOAS in the News: Science Friday interviews Asa Rennermalm Today

Streaming live at 3:20-3:28 p.m ET on Fri. Jan. 22 on https://www.sciencefriday.com/. Science Friday (Public Radio) interviews Asa Rennermalm.  An associate professor in the Department of Geography, at Rutgers University New Brunswick, Rennermalm is a physical geographer specializing in ...
Read More
Greenland Melting Likely Increased by Bacteria in Sediment

Greenland Melting Likely Increased by Bacteria in Sediment

Microbes in meltwater stream sediment may help boost island’s contribution to sea-level rise Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island’s contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists. That’s because the microbes ...
Read More
Big Differences in How Coral Reef Fish Larvae are Dispersed

Big Differences in How Coral Reef Fish Larvae are Dispersed

Rutgers-led research could help scientists improve conservation of species How the larvae of colorful clownfish that live among coral reefs in the Philippines are dispersed varies widely, depending on the year and seasons – a Rutgers-led finding that could help scientists improve conservation ...
Read More
A New Year’s Message from EOAS Director Robert Kopp

A New Year’s Message from EOAS Director Robert Kopp

Dear EOAS Community, I am sure many of you have, as I have, found it difficult to focus during this extraordinary afternoon, coming at the end of a year of mass fatalities with few precedents in American history. The videos of the ongoing but doomed coup attempt in Washington, DC, puts yet another ...
Read More
How to Identify Heat-Stressed Corals

How to Identify Heat-Stressed Corals

“Coral hospital” tool could help safeguard reefs facing climate change Researchers have found a novel way to identify heat-stressed corals, which could help scientists pinpoint the coral species that need protection from warming ocean waters linked to climate change, according to a Rutgers ...
Read More
Department of Environmental Sciences Wins Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

Department of Environmental Sciences Wins Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

By the Office of Communications at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Rutgers Department of Environmental Sciences (DES) was named winner of the 2020 Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award, in the Environmental Education (Educator Led) category, at a virtual ceremony ...
Read More
COVID-19 Pandemic had Big Impact on Commercial Fishing in Northeast

COVID-19 Pandemic had Big Impact on Commercial Fishing in Northeast

Rutgers study shows resilience among fishermen facing market disruptions With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers ...
Read More
Planning Ahead Protects Fish and Fisheries

Planning Ahead Protects Fish and Fisheries

Effective planning for climate change helps avoid conflicts over ocean uses Conservation of fish and other marine life migrating from warming ocean waters will be more effective and also protect commercial fisheries if plans are made now to cope with climate change, according to a- ...
Read More
The Department of Environmental Sciences is Awarded a 2020 Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

The Department of Environmental Sciences is Awarded a 2020 Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

The award recognizes the department’s excellence in environmental education The Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, has been named the recipient of the 2020 Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award for Environmental ...
Read More
#EOAS in the News: Heidi Fuchs Discusses how Snail Adaptations to Climate Change are Potentially Deadly

#EOAS in the News: Heidi Fuchs Discusses how Snail Adaptations to Climate Change are Potentially Deadly

Noticing that two snail species on the U.S. east coast have adapted to climate change by moving into shallower, warmer water, a habitat that could be potentially deadly for them, #EOAS faculty member Heidi Fuchs and her colleagues examined 60 years of data on 50 invertebrate species including ...
Read More
#EOAS in the News: How Snowy will this Winter Be? David Robinson Weighs In

#EOAS in the News: How Snowy will this Winter Be? David Robinson Weighs In

La Niña will be strong during the upcoming winter, so does this mean New Jersey will get more than the average amount of snow this year? EOAS faculty member and N.J. State Climatologist David Robinson told The Star Ledger (nj.com) in the article La Niña has strengthened, what this means for N.J. ...
Read More
#EOAS in the News: Ximing Guo speaks to Science Magazine about the Impact of Genomics on Aquaculture

#EOAS in the News: Ximing Guo speaks to Science Magazine about the Impact of Genomics on Aquaculture

Science Magazine interviewed EOAS faculty member Ximing Guo for the article “New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect” published Nov. 19, 2020 Guo is a Professor at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Rutgers Department of Marine and ...
Read More
Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface

Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface

Rutgers-led study sheds light on subsurface melting of thick ice billions of years ago The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes. ...
Read More
Robock Elected to lead the AGU College of Fellows

Robock Elected to lead the AGU College of Fellows

Professor Alan Robock has been elected Chair-Elect of the College of Fellows of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).  AGU is the world’s largest professional organization of atmospheric, earth, and ocean scientists.  The College of Fellows is has been organized to provide a venue where Fellows ...
Read More
Elizabeth L. Sikes to Deliver the Cesare Emiliani Lecture at the AGU Fall Meeting

Elizabeth L. Sikes to Deliver the Cesare Emiliani Lecture at the AGU Fall Meeting

The annual lecture recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of paleoceanography. EOAS faculty member Elizabeth L. Sikes will deliver The Cesare Emiliani Lecture at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.  Sikes will deliver her lecture, titled “The Southern Ocean’s role in ...
Read More
SEBS Names Four EOAS Faculty Members 2020 Excellence Award Recipients

SEBS Names Four EOAS Faculty Members 2020 Excellence Award Recipients

The Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences honors Richard Lathrop, Janice McDonnell, Yair Rosenthal, and Silke Severmann for their “dedication and impactful work.” The Interim Executive Dean of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Laura Lawson, has named EOAS faculty members ...
Read More
#EOAS in the News: Rachael Winfree Speaks to CNN about the First Map of the Global Bee Population

#EOAS in the News: Rachael Winfree Speaks to CNN about the First Map of the Global Bee Population

“Surprisingly, despite the critical importance of bees as pollinators, until now there has been no comprehensive source of information on where the different bee species of the world are found… the authors of this paper are the world experts on this topic, and their work is a big step ...
Read More
Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

Warm, moist rivers of air may have continent-wide effects and influence climate change Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according ...
Read More
#EOAS in the News: “The Paris Agreement: Our Best Chance at Keeping Global Temperatures from Continuing to Skyrocket”

#EOAS in the News: “The Paris Agreement: Our Best Chance at Keeping Global Temperatures from Continuing to Skyrocket”

The U.S. withdrew from the Paris Agreement on November 4, 2020, the day after election day.  In an op-ed for the Star Ledger (NJ.com) titled “Climate Change: Yup, That’s on the Ballot Too” published on October 30, 2020, EOAS faculty member Pam McElwee wrote, “The Paris Agreement, while ...
Read More
Marine Fisheries Will Not Offset Farm Losses after Nuclear War

Marine Fisheries Will Not Offset Farm Losses after Nuclear War

Effective pre-war fisheries management could help in global food emergency After a nuclear war, wild-catch marine fisheries will not offset the loss of food grown on land, especially if widespread overfishing continues, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. But effective pre-war fisheries ...
Read More