Water and Industry: Rutgers Student Screening and Discussion of “Brave Blue World”

Water and Industry: Rutgers Student Screening and Discussion of “Brave Blue World”

By Carol Peters During the April 13 online event, a panel of Rutgers undergraduate students from different academic backgrounds will discuss their visions for solutions to issues surrounding global water and sanitation. “What can we do to help solve the global water crisis in both our personal and ...
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Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock-Hard Skeletons

Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock-Hard Skeletons

Scientists’ findings suggest corals will withstand climate change Charles Darwin, the British naturalist who championed the theory of evolution, noted that corals form far-reaching structures, largely made of limestone, that surround tropical islands. He didn’t know how they performed this feat. ...
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Overfishing of Atlantic Cod Likely Did Not Cause Genetic Changes

Overfishing of Atlantic Cod Likely Did Not Cause Genetic Changes

Study suggests reducing fishing and addressing environmental changes would help cod recover Overfishing likely did not cause the Atlantic cod, an iconic species, to evolve genetically and mature earlier, according to a study led by Rutgers University and the University of Oslo – the first of its ...
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“Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast

“Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast

Higher groundwater levels from sea-level rise and increased flooding are likely the most important factors Why are “ghost forests” filled with dead trees expanding along the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast? Higher groundwater levels linked to sea-level rise and increased flooding from ...
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Microplastic Sizes in Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Coastal Ocean Revealed

Microplastic Sizes in Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Coastal Ocean Revealed

Rutgers research shows stormwater could be important source of plastic pollution Rutgers scientists for the first time have pinpointed the sizes of microplastics from a highly urbanized estuarine and coastal system with numerous sources of fresh water, including the Hudson River and Raritan River. ...
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Juliane Gross Awarded the Antarctic Service Medal

Juliane Gross Awarded the Antarctic Service Medal

Gross received the award in recognition of the service she provides to the United States by conducting cutting-edge research in Antarctica. By Carol Heher Peters The United States of America Secretary of Defense has awarded EOAS faculty member Juliane Gross the Antarctic Service Medal “in ...
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A Conversation with Polar Oceanographer Rebecca Jackson

A Conversation with Polar Oceanographer Rebecca Jackson

This article by John Dos Passos Coggin continues Climate.gov’s series of interviews with current and former fellows in the NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Program about the nature of their research funded by NOAA and what career and education highlights preceded and followed ...
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A Look at Climate Change and the IPCC as the U.S. Re-enters the Paris Agreement

A Look at Climate Change and the IPCC as the U.S. Re-enters the Paris Agreement

Climate change is one of the most serious global problems today. Increasing temperatures, rising sea levels, acidification of the ocean, damaging hurricanes, droughts, wildfires and other extreme events have caused devastating human, environmental and economic damage. In response to escalating ...
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Fishes Contribute Roughly 1.65 Billion Tons of Carbon in Feces and Other Matter Annually

Fishes Contribute Roughly 1.65 Billion Tons of Carbon in Feces and Other Matter Annually

Scientists have little understanding of the role fishes play in the global carbon cycle linked to climate change, but a Rutgers-led study found that carbon in feces, respiration and other excretions from fishes – roughly 1.65 billion tons annually – make up about 16 percent of the total ...
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On the Banks of a Pristine Raritan River

On the Banks of a Pristine Raritan River

Rutgers Cooperative Extension faculty member Michele Bakacs is leading an effort to study pathogens in the Raritan River, aiming to ensure the river eventually meets fishable and swimmable standards in New Jersey and becomes a resource that is cherished and celebrated.  By ...
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How Rocks Rusted on Earth and Turned Red

How Rocks Rusted on Earth and Turned Red

Important phenomenon could help assess future climate change How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A Rutgers-led study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were ...
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Bacteria and Algae Get Rides in Clouds

Bacteria and Algae Get Rides in Clouds

Microbes could pose health, ecosystem risks when rain brings them to Earth Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored ...
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Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Changed Genes in Surviving Bats

Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Changed Genes in Surviving Bats

Study has big implications for management of bat populations Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big implications ...
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Important Climate Change Mystery Solved by Scientists

Important Climate Change Mystery Solved by Scientists

Revised Holocene temperature record affirms role of greenhouse gases in recent millennia Scientists have resolved a key climate change mystery, showing that the annual global temperature today is the warmest of the past 10,000 years – contrary to recent research, according to a Rutgers-led study ...
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Nuclear War Could Trigger Big El Niño and Decrease Seafood

Nuclear War Could Trigger Big El Niño and Decrease Seafood

Unprecedented warming in equatorial Pacific Ocean could last up to seven years A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. ...
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#EOAS in the News: Science Friday interviews Asa Rennermalm Today

#EOAS in the News: Science Friday interviews Asa Rennermalm Today

Streaming live at 3:20-3:28 p.m ET on Fri. Jan. 22 on https://www.sciencefriday.com/. Science Friday (Public Radio) interviews Asa Rennermalm.  An associate professor in the Department of Geography, at Rutgers University New Brunswick, Rennermalm is a physical geographer specializing in ...
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Greenland Melting Likely Increased by Bacteria in Sediment

Greenland Melting Likely Increased by Bacteria in Sediment

Microbes in meltwater stream sediment may help boost island’s contribution to sea-level rise Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island’s contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists. That’s because the microbes ...
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Big Differences in How Coral Reef Fish Larvae are Dispersed

Big Differences in How Coral Reef Fish Larvae are Dispersed

Rutgers-led research could help scientists improve conservation of species How the larvae of colorful clownfish that live among coral reefs in the Philippines are dispersed varies widely, depending on the year and seasons – a Rutgers-led finding that could help scientists improve conservation ...
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A New Year’s Message from EOAS Director Robert Kopp

A New Year’s Message from EOAS Director Robert Kopp

Dear EOAS Community, I am sure many of you have, as I have, found it difficult to focus during this extraordinary afternoon, coming at the end of a year of mass fatalities with few precedents in American history. The videos of the ongoing but doomed coup attempt in Washington, DC, puts yet another ...
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How to Identify Heat-Stressed Corals

How to Identify Heat-Stressed Corals

“Coral hospital” tool could help safeguard reefs facing climate change Researchers have found a novel way to identify heat-stressed corals, which could help scientists pinpoint the coral species that need protection from warming ocean waters linked to climate change, according to a Rutgers ...
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