Earth System Science News Archive


Six Students to Conduct Research in Cordillera de Talamanca

Six Students to Conduct Research in Cordillera de Talamanca

Agreement between Rutgers and the University of Costa Rica is funded by the National Science Foundation. As of July of this year, the first six students who will work on the project called Geoscience Research at the Cordillera Talamanca (GREAT for its acronym in English) will arrive in the, ...
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Student on Front Lines of Orangutan Conservation Research

Student on Front Lines of Orangutan Conservation Research

Didik Prasetyo is dedicated to understanding and protecting the endangered great apes. The great ape was one of several orangutans that Prasetyo and other researchers followed at the Tuanan Orangutan Research Station in the Mawas Conservation Area in Indonesia. Prasetyo was skeptical when ...
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Warm Arctic Means Colder, Snowier Winters in Northeastern U.S.

Warm Arctic Means Colder, Snowier Winters in Northeastern U.S.

Rutgers scholar says warming Arctic’s connection to U.S. weather is “no coincidence” Scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) have linked the frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States to Arctic temperatures. Their research was ...
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Fiber-Fermenting Bacteria Improve Health of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Dietary fibers promote gut bacteria that benefit blood glucose control, says study by Rutgers and other scientists. The fight against type 2 diabetes may soon improve thanks to a pioneering high-fiber diet study led by a Rutgers University–New Brunswick professor. Promotion of a select group of ...
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Environmental Statistician Michael Stein Appointed as Rutgers’ Inaugural Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

Environmental Statistician Michael Stein Appointed as Rutgers’ Inaugural Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

Award-winning University of Chicago professor will convene fall seminar in Statistics of the Earth System The Rutgers University-New Brunswick Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS) and Department of Statistics are pleased to announce the appointment of Michael Stein , the ...
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Damage Encourages Male Maple Species to Become Female

Damage Encourages Male Maple Species to Become Female

Striped maples wait to last minute before choosing their sex. A few years ago, Rutgers researcher Jennifer Blake-Mahmud was working on a botany project in Virginia when colleagues pointed out a striped maple, a common tree in the understory of mountain forests from Nova Scotia to Georgia. “They ...
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Personal Bioblitz Connects People with Nature

Personal Bioblitz Connects People with Nature

‘Count one, count them all’ – anyone with a Rutgers connection can photograph wild species in citizen science project. When Lena Struwe was hiking in the Monteverde Cloud Forest Biological Reserve in Costa Rica three years ago, she spotted a yellowish harvestman, a spider-type animal, on a hiking ...
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Throwing Back “The Big Ones” Saves a Fishery from Hot Water

Throwing Back “The Big Ones” Saves a Fishery from Hot Water

Malin Pinsky has a new Commentary in PNAS, “Throwing back the big ones saves a fishery from hot water.” In it, he explains why a recent paper by Arnault Le Bris on the Maine lobster fishery provides important insight into efforts to create climate-ready fisheries management. Practices like ...
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Threatened Shorebird Species Faces Increased Peril

Threatened Shorebird Species Faces Increased Peril

Red knots fall below 10,000 in aerial surveys. Scientists from Rutgers University–New Brunswick and elsewhere documented fewer than 10,000 red knot shorebirds in Chile in January, down from more than 13,000 a year earlier. “Clearly, this subspecies of red knots – listed as threatened in the U.S. ...
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The More Kinds of Bees, the Better for Humans

The More Kinds of Bees, the Better for Humans

Study of 48 farms in two states shows abundance of species means lots of pollination. The larger an area, the more species of wild bees are needed to pollinate crops, a Rutgers University study shows. The findings appear today in the journal Science. Many controlled ecological experiments have ...
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Saba Group Successfully Completes Glider-Based Ecosystem Deployment in Antarctica

Saba Group Successfully Completes Glider-Based Ecosystem Deployment in Antarctica

A small team led by Dr. Grace Saba recently deployed a Teledyne Webb Slocum Glider with attached Acoustic Zooplankton Fish Profiler (AZFP) that successfully completed a 3-week mission in the Antarctic to gather data on marine ecosystems. Dr. Corie Charpentier and undergraduate Rachael Young ...
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Don’t Blame Hurricanes for Most Big Storm Surges in Northeast

Don’t Blame Hurricanes for Most Big Storm Surges in Northeast

Pioneering Rutgers study examines atmospheric patterns during nor’easters and other extratropical cyclones. Hurricanes spawn most of the largest storm surges in the northeastern U.S., right? Wrong, according to a study by Rutgers University–New Brunswick scientists. Extratropical cyclones , ...
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Dr. Paul Falkowski Awarded Prestigious Tyler Prize

Dr. Paul Falkowski Awarded Prestigious Tyler Prize

The 2018 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement – often described as the ‘Nobel Prize for the Environment’ – has been awarded to Paul Falkowski and James J. McCarthy, for their decades of leadership in understanding – and communicating – the impacts of climate change. Paul Falkowski, one of the ...
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New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance Launches Social Media Campaign

New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance Launches Social Media Campaign

Rutgers-facilitated group seeks to inform the public about greenhouse gas emissions, climate change impacts and resilience. Did you know that New Jersey can expect higher temperatures, heavier rains, rising sea levels and more frequent and severe coastal flooding this century? Did you know the ...
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Four Biochemical “Legos” Underlie Energetic Basis of Life

Four Biochemical “Legos” Underlie Energetic Basis of Life

Deep dive into the 3D structures of proteins reveals key building blocks. Rutgers scientists have found the “Legos of life” – four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism – after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to ...
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Climate Engineering, Once Started, Would Have Severe Impacts If Stopped

Climate Engineering, Once Started, Would Have Severe Impacts If Stopped

Rutgers researchers co-author first study on biological impacts of abruptly ending efforts to cool Earth’s climate.  Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe ...
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Geology Museum Open House Features 13-Million-Year-Old Ancestor

Geology Museum Open House Features 13-Million-Year-Old Ancestor

Museum’s 50th annual Open House and Mineral Sale will feature exhibits, lectures, activities for kids. About 13 million years ago, a distant ancestor of modern apes and humans suffered an untimely death on the arid landscape of northern Kenya. Last year, a Rutgers scientist helped bring its tiny ...
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Alan Robock Leads $3 Million Study on Impacts of Nuclear War

Alan Robock Leads $3 Million Study on Impacts of Nuclear War

By Ken Kurtulik Thirty-six years ago, EOAS member Dr. Alan Robock, now a distinguished professor of environmental science at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, attended an American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, where a paper on the climatic effects of nuclear war was to be presented.  The ...
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Sea-Level Rise Projections Made Hazy by Antarctic Instability

Sea-Level Rise Projections Made Hazy by Antarctic Instability

Scientists should have a much better understanding in a few decades how high the sea level could rise, Rutgers-led study says.   It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new Rutgers University–New Brunswick-led analysis. The ...
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Mass of Warm Rock Rising Beneath New England

Mass of Warm Rock Rising Beneath New England

First-of-its kind seismic study challenges textbook concepts of geology.  Slowly but steadily, an enormous mass of warm rock is rising beneath part of New England, although a major volcanic eruption isn’t likely for millions of years, a Rutgers University-led study suggests. The research is ...
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