Earth System Science News Archive


Reshaping Darwin’s Tree of Life

Reshaping Darwin’s Tree of Life

Rutgers and other scientists propose a new paradigm that paints a more inclusive picture of the evolution of organisms and ecosystems. In 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Now, scientists from Rutgers ...
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Stony Corals More Resistant to Climate Change Than Thought

Stony Corals More Resistant to Climate Change Than Thought

Researchers show how corals create rock-hard skeletons Stony corals may be more resilient to ocean acidification than once thought, according to a Rutgers University study that shows they rely on proteins to help create their rock-hard skeletons. “The bottom line is that corals will make rock even ...
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Springs were Critical Water Sources for Early Humans in East Africa, Rutgers Study Finds

Springs were Critical Water Sources for Early Humans in East Africa, Rutgers Study Finds

Scientists show how groundwater-fed springs may have influenced human evolution.  About 1 to 2 million years ago, early humans in East Africa periodically faced very dry conditions, with little or no water in sight. But they likely had access to hundreds of springs that lingered despite long dry ...
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EOAS Graduate Fellow Wins NSF Fellowship!

EOAS Graduate Fellow Wins NSF Fellowship!

Congratulations to EOAS Graduate Fellow Alexandra Ramos for receiving an NSF Graduate Research fellowship! She is one of only 2,000 selected nationally for an NSF graduate fellowship for 2017 (and one of only 4 to receive it for Physical and Dynamical Meteorology!). Alexandra joins 11 other- ...
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After Deepwater Horizon Spill: Which Animals Weathered The Disaster

After Deepwater Horizon Spill: Which Animals Weathered The Disaster

After Deepwater Horizon Spill: Which Animals Weathered the Disaster A new study from a Coastal Waters Consortium team of researchers led by Rutgers University postdoctoral researcher, Michael McCann, has found which birds, fish, insects and other animals affected by the Deepwater Horizon explosion ...
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Evidence of Sea-Level Change in Southeast Asia 6,000 Years Ago Has Implications for Today’s Coastal Dwellers, Rutgers Study Finds

Evidence of Sea-Level Change in Southeast Asia 6,000 Years Ago Has Implications for Today’s Coastal Dwellers, Rutgers Study Finds

For the 100 million people who live within 3 feet of sea level in East and Southeast Asia, the news that sea level in their region fluctuated wildly more than 6,000 years ago is important, according to research published by a team of ocean scientists and statisticians, including Rutgers professors ...
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How Evolution Alters Biological Invasions

How Evolution Alters Biological Invasions

Rutgers graduate student Cara Faillace and Professor Peter Morin studied evolution in models of invaded ecosystems.  Biological invasions pose major threats to biodiversity, but little is known about how evolution might alter their impacts over time. Now, Rutgers scientists have performed the ...
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Tallying the Social Cost of Climate-Changing Carbon Dioxide

Tallying the Social Cost of Climate-Changing Carbon Dioxide

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel power plants, motor vehicles and other human sources are the primary driver of global climate change, which threatens people and ecosystems around the world. But what, quantitatively, is the social cost of carbon dioxide – the economic damage caused by a 1 ...
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EOAS Graduate Fellow wins AGU Award!

Congratulations to Sasha Leidman for winning the 2016 AGU Cryosphere Science Innovation Aware for Students,  also known as the “Flash-freeze” award presented at last week’s AGU meeting in San Francisco. Students interested in competing for the award has to submit a letter of ...
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Finding Nemo: Scientifically!

Finding Nemo: Scientifically!

It is a well known fact that baby fish will often float with ocean currents, following them wherever they may take them. But just how far from ‘home’ do they usually travel? DEENR professor and EOAS member Dr. Malin Pinsky along with some of his colleagues think they’ve found the ...
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Asteroid Impacts Could Create Habitats for Life

Asteroid Impacts Could Create Habitats for Life

An international team of 38 scientists, including Rutgers’ and EOAS member scientist Sonia Tikoo, has shown how large asteroid impacts deform rocks and possibly create habitats for early life on Earth and elsewhere. Around 65 million years ago, a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico, ...
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Rutgers EOAS to Recieve $3 Million for Coastal Resilience Program

Rutgers EOAS to Recieve $3 Million for Coastal Resilience Program

A $3 million grant will kickstart a new program for graduate students interested in climate change and its impact on coasts. Rutgers received nearly $3 million in funding from the National Science Foundation’s Research Traineeship Program for research and training in coastal resilience. The ...
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Atlantic Surfclam Study Results to be ready in 2018

Atlantic Surfclam Study Results to be ready in 2018

By the summer of 2018, researchers from Rutgers University’s Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory in Bivalve, NJ hope to have the results of an exciting new project aimed at culturing Atlantic surfclams (Spisula solidissima), as a potential robust new farm species. Preliminary results have ...
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Rep. Bob Inglis Visits Rutgers University

Rep. Bob Inglis Visits Rutgers University

Former South Carolina Congressman and climate change advocate Bob Inglis recently spoke a crowded room on the Cook Campus of Rutgers University, sharing his relatively unique story in his role to combat climate change. A heavily conservative politician, Inglis has been fighting an uphill battle as ...
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July 2016 Was the Hottest Month Ever Recorded

July 2016 Was the Hottest Month Ever Recorded

Whether you live in Northern Siberia or Northern New Jersey, chances are you experienced the heat and in some places the oppressive humidity that dominated the weather patterns over most of the summer. July 2016 smashed the global records, as by far and away the warmest month ever recorded by man, ...
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Climate Tipping Points — What Do They Mean for Society?

Article originally published in Rutgers Today on 7/11/16 by Todd B. Bates   The phrase “tipping point” passed its own tipping point and caught fire after author Malcolm Gladwell’s so-named 2000 book. It’s now frequently used in discussions about climate change, but what are “climate tipping ...
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Holocene’s Earthquake Record Preserved Thanks to Rising Sea Level

Rutgers University researcher Tina Dura, along with EOAS researchers Ben Horton & Bob Kopp as well as additional collaborators from several different universities, have published a paper analyzing the well-intact Holocene earthquake history found in ice sheets around the Pacific subduction. ...
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Rutgers Scientists Help Create World’s Largest Coral Gene Database

Rutgers Scientists Help Create World’s Largest Coral Gene Database

Coral reefs – stunning, critical habitats for an enormous array of prized fish and other species – have survived five major extinction events over the last 250 million years. Now, an international team of scientists led by Rutgers faculty has conducted the world’s most comprehensive analysis of ...
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EOAS Scientist Works to Better Understand Future Flood Risks when considering Sea-Level Rise

Living in a world with a rising sea-level has proposed an interesting challenge to scientists: What exactly is the best way to factor sea-level rise (SLR) into estimates for future flood hazards? According to EOAS Scientist Robert Kopp and his collaborators, the answer lies in incorporating many ...
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Impacts of Land-Atmosphere Interactions for Changes in Terrestrial Aridity Under Global Warming

   Although global climate models generally reflect increasing precipitation over land with anthropogenic warming, the projected faster increase in evaporative demand actually leads to an overall increase of aridity. Studies of the land region aridity increase with warming have largely emphasized ...
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