Earth System Science News Archive


SEBS Names Four EOAS Faculty Members 2020 Excellence Award Recipients

SEBS Names Four EOAS Faculty Members 2020 Excellence Award Recipients

The Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences honors Richard Lathrop, Janice McDonnell, Yair Rosenthal, and Silke Severmann for their “dedication and impactful work.” The Interim Executive Dean of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Laura Lawson, has named EOAS faculty members ...
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#EOAS in the News: Rachael Winfree Speaks to CNN about the First Map of the Global Bee Population

#EOAS in the News: Rachael Winfree Speaks to CNN about the First Map of the Global Bee Population

“Surprisingly, despite the critical importance of bees as pollinators, until now there has been no comprehensive source of information on where the different bee species of the world are found… the authors of this paper are the world experts on this topic, and their work is a big step ...
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Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

Warm, moist rivers of air may have continent-wide effects and influence climate change Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according ...
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#EOAS in the News: “The Paris Agreement: Our Best Chance at Keeping Global Temperatures from Continuing to Skyrocket”

#EOAS in the News: “The Paris Agreement: Our Best Chance at Keeping Global Temperatures from Continuing to Skyrocket”

The U.S. withdrew from the Paris Agreement on November 4, 2020, the day after election day.  In an op-ed for the Star Ledger (NJ.com) titled “Climate Change: Yup, That’s on the Ballot Too” published on October 30, 2020, EOAS faculty member Pam McElwee wrote, “The Paris Agreement, while ...
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Marine Fisheries Will Not Offset Farm Losses after Nuclear War

Marine Fisheries Will Not Offset Farm Losses after Nuclear War

Effective pre-war fisheries management could help in global food emergency After a nuclear war, wild-catch marine fisheries will not offset the loss of food grown on land, especially if widespread overfishing continues, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. But effective pre-war fisheries ...
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How Did Red Algae Survive in Extreme Environments?

How Did Red Algae Survive in Extreme Environments?

Rutgers-led team will study algae from hot springs worldwide, including in Yellowstone National Park Red algae have persisted in hot springs and surrounding rocks for about 1 billion years. Now, a Rutgers-led team will investigate why these single-celled extremists have thrived in harsh ...
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Helping Shape Rutgers’ Climate Commitment

Helping Shape Rutgers’ Climate Commitment

Amid an extraordinary year altered by the coronavirus pandemic, work continues at Rutgers University to address another ongoing crisis with dire consequences: climate change. Following the release of an interim report, the President’s Task Force on Carbon Neutrality and Climate Resilience is ...
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Rutgers Collaborative Science Communication Initiative Aims to Position Rutgers as a Leader in Science Communication

Rutgers Collaborative Science Communication Initiative Aims to Position Rutgers as a Leader in Science Communication

By Carol Peters The Initiative’s goal is to create a network for anyone at Rutgers interested in science communication research, teaching, outreach, professional practice, and training.  Communicators trained to explain science clearly and effectively in order to educate, inform, improve, ...
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Rutgers NASA-Funded E•NIG•MA Project Releases New Video Exploring the Origins of Life on Earth

Rutgers NASA-Funded E•NIG•MA Project Releases New Video Exploring the Origins of Life on Earth

As part of the NASA-funded E•NIG•MA project, #EOAS faculty members Paul Falkowski, Julianne Gross, Nathan Yee and colleagues across the Rutgers Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences produced an eight-minute video with Tilapia Films titled “Tools of Science Case Study: E•NIG•MA.” Watch the ...
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#EOAS in the News: “To Stabilize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First”

#EOAS in the News: “To Stabilize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First”

In an op-ed in the Star Ledger titled “To Stablize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First,” EOAS Director Robert Kopp wrote,  “Barring extraordinary new technologies to hasten the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, most of the warming we are causing will last for millennia. So we ...
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Most Nations Failing to Protect Nature in COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Plans

Most Nations Failing to Protect Nature in COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Plans

Outbreak provides opportunity to reset economy and reverse ecosystem, species losses The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to reset the global economy and reverse decades of ecosystem and species losses, but most countries are failing to invest in nature-related economic reforms or ...
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How to Get a Handle on Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Plants

How to Get a Handle on Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Plants

Combining two tools would boost understanding of climate change How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It’s a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help ...
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Ocean Algae Get “Coup de Grace” from Viruses

Ocean Algae Get “Coup de Grace” from Viruses

Viruses don’t immediately kill algae but live in harmony with them Scientists have long believed that ocean viruses always quickly kill algae, but Rutgers-led research shows they live in harmony with algae and viruses provide a “coup de grace” only when blooms of algae are already stressed and ...
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#EOAS in the News: Bat Ticks Discovered in NJ for the First Time

#EOAS in the News: Bat Ticks Discovered in NJ for the First Time

In this interview with 94.3 The Point, #EOAS faculty member Dina Fonseca and Rutgers Ph.D. student James Occi explain that they have found ticks that prey on bats in New Jersey, specifically in Mercer and Sussex counties. In this interview, Fonseca and Occi explain that people who have had bats ...
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Author Kim Stanley Robinson to Read and Discuss “The Ministry for the Future” October 8

Author Kim Stanley Robinson to Read and Discuss “The Ministry for the Future” October 8

By Carol Peters Discover the insights science fiction can provide about climate change and its impacts when best-selling author Kim Stanley Robinson reads from his new book, followed by a panel discussion featuring Rutgers faculty members Naomi Klein, Robert Kopp, Jorge Marcone, and Cymie Payne. ...
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Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

It’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight inequality will affect future trends Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future ...
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The Rutgers Ecological Preserve: A Living Lab and Welcome Escape

The Rutgers Ecological Preserve: A Living Lab and Welcome Escape

By Carol Peters As 400 acres of contiguous forest right outside of New Brunswick, the Rutgers EcoPreserve provides an ideal respite from suburbia, a living laboratory for Rutgers University, the state, and beyond, and a protected home for a variety of plant and animal species. It’s a cool, airy ...
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NSF News: Research reveals coral spawning features

NSF News: Research reveals coral spawning features

Surprisingly, stony coral sperm and eggs share similar genetic functions By NSF Public Affairs, originally posted on August 25, 2020 During coral mass spawning events, which are in sync with the moon’s cycle, stony coral colonies simultaneously release an underwater cloud of sperm and eggs ...
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Bacteria Can Defuse Dangerous Chemical In Passaic River

Bacteria Can Defuse Dangerous Chemical In Passaic River

Rutgers study suggests pollutant’s toxicity could be decreased. Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers ...
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#EOAS in the News: July, 2020 Hottest on Record

#EOAS in the News: July, 2020 Hottest on Record

July 2020 was the hottest month in New Jersey in 125 years of record keeping, EOAS faculty member David Robinson, who is also the New Jersey State Climatologist, told the Bergen Record in an article titled “July was the hottest month on record in New Jersey — but you figured that already, ...
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