Earth System Science News Archive


Indigenous People Vital for Understanding Environmental Change

Indigenous People Vital for Understanding Environmental Change

Rutgers-led research shows how local knowledge can help manage ecosystems and wildlife Grassroots knowledge from Indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research. The study, published in the Journal of Applied, ...
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Decline of Bees, Other Pollinators Threatens U.S. Crop Yields

Decline of Bees, Other Pollinators Threatens U.S. Crop Yields

Largest study of its kind highlights risk to global food security Crop yields for apples, cherries and blueberries across the United States are being reduced by a lack of pollinators, according to Rutgers-led research, the most comprehensive study of its kind to date. Most of the world’s crops ...
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Rutgers’ New Global Environmental Change Grants Provide Seed Funding to Seven Projects

Rutgers’ New Global Environmental Change Grants Provide Seed Funding to Seven Projects

By Carol Peters Rutgers’ New Global Environmental Change Grants Provide Seed Funding to Seven Projects    How will the Amazon forest respond to a warmer climate and more frequent droughts? How can the environmental humanities, critical social sciences, law, and planetary observation ...
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Climate change: The South Pole feels the heat

Climate change: The South Pole feels the heat

The extreme South Pole warming is within the range of natural variability, based on climate modeling simulations, but warming caused by humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions likely intensified it. By Todd Bates The South Pole has warmed at over three times the global rate since 1989, according to a ...
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Announcing New Environmental Sciences Department Chair: Donna Fennell

Announcing New Environmental Sciences Department Chair: Donna Fennell

Message from SEBS Interim Executive Dean Laura Lawson Dear SEBS/NJAES community,  I am pleased to announce that Dr. Donna Fennell has been appointed to serve as Chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences. Donna Fennell has an undergraduate degree in Agricultural Engineering from the ...
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Rutgers Moves Toward a Climate Action Plan

Rutgers Moves Toward a Climate Action Plan

Rutgers climate task force tackles solutions; committee to evaluate fossil fuels divestment Rutgers has taken the next step toward developing a climate action plan to reduce the university’s carbon footprint and to enhance the ability of Rutgers and the state of New Jersey to manage the risks of a ...
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#EOAS in the News: COVID-19, Racial Injustice and Climate Change Require a Bold Approach, Not Incrementalism

#EOAS in the News: COVID-19, Racial Injustice and Climate Change Require a Bold Approach, Not Incrementalism

EOAS faculty members Jeanne Herb and Marjorie Kaplan write an op-ed for the Star Ledger in which they argue that now is the time to act on advancing a healthy, resilient, sustainable and fair New Jersey. ...
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How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation

How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation

A farmer tends rice fields in Yen Bai, Vietnam, where balancing goals for sustainable development and management of ecosystems is challenging. Photo: Pamela McElwee Rutgers University–New Brunswick ...
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Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls

Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls

Rutgers study could lead to better disinfection methods and understanding of coronavirus and other risks Can antibiotic-resistant bacteria escape from sewers into waterways and cause a disease outbreak? A new Rutgers study, published in the journal Environmental Science: Water Research & ...
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#EOAS in the News: Science on the Hill: Calculating Climate

#EOAS in the News: Science on the Hill: Calculating Climate

#EOAS Director Robert Kopp spoke with Scientific American about climate models and long-term climate prediction. ...
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Revisiting a Volcano’s Wrath

Revisiting a Volcano’s Wrath

By Craig Winston 40 years ago Mount St. Helens unleashed its fury with devastating results but much has been learned from the eruption since. Four decades have passed, yet Alan Robock and Clifford Mass are still intertwined by a rare geological occurrence: a major volcanic eruption in the United ...
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New Data Discloses Flood Risk of Every Home in the Contiguous US

New Data Discloses Flood Risk of Every Home in the Contiguous US

The data, based on decades of peer-reviewed research, provides the cumulative risk of flooding for more than 142 million homes and properties over a 30-year mortgage. The nonprofit research and technology group First Street Foundation has publicly released flood risk data for more than 142 million ...
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Dangerous Tick-Borne Bacterium Extremely Rare in New Jersey

Dangerous Tick-Borne Bacterium Extremely Rare in New Jersey

The mystery behind the rise in spotted fever cases continues There’s some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Rutgers researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes ...
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#EOAS in the News: Dina Fonseca on Mosquitos in NJ Summer 2020

#EOAS in the News: Dina Fonseca on Mosquitos in NJ Summer 2020

By Amanda Oglesby, Asbury Park Press Bret Ulozas sprays his yard for mosquitoes in the New Egypt section of Plumsted in order to keep the blood suckers at bay. The 49-year-old applies insecticide to reduce the nuisance of mosquitoes, especially as his family spends more time in the ...
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#EOAS in the News: “Managing the Majestic Jumbo Flying Squid”

#EOAS in the News: “Managing the Majestic Jumbo Flying Squid”

In an article in The New York Times titled  “Managing the Majestic Jumbo Flying Squid,” EOAS faculty member Malin Pinsky, an associate professor in the Rutgers Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, said, “The impacts of climate change and variability are ...
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Mangrove Trees Won’t Survive Sea-Level Rise by 2050 if Emissions Aren’t Cut

Mangrove Trees Won’t Survive Sea-Level Rise by 2050 if Emissions Aren’t Cut

Scientists explored how the valuable ecosystems responded to rising seas in the past Mangrove trees – valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates – won’t survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren’t reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in ...
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Outer Limits

Outer Limits

By Craig Winston Bermingham studies meteorites to help determine the elements that built Earth. Hearing about the challenges of geochemistry and cosmochemistry from Assistant Professor Dr. Katherine Bermingham sometimes sounds like the discourse from an episode of Rick and Morty, the animated ...
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#EOAS in the News: Is it Safe to Swim in the Ocean During COVID-19?

#EOAS in the News: Is it Safe to Swim in the Ocean During COVID-19?

“Do saltwater and sunshine at the Shore kill the coronavirus? Here’s what science says.” ...
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Modern Sea-Level Rise Linked to Human Activities, Rutgers Research Reaffirms

Modern Sea-Level Rise Linked to Human Activities, Rutgers Research Reaffirms

Surprising glacial and nearly ice-free periods in last 66 million years New research by Rutgers scientists reaffirms that modern sea-level rise is linked to human activities and not to changes in Earth’s orbit. Surprisingly, Earth had nearly ice-free conditions with carbon dioxide levels not much ...
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Oyster Farming and Shorebirds Likely Can Coexist

Oyster Farming and Shorebirds Likely Can Coexist

A red knot among a flock of migratory shorebirds foraging along the Delaware Bayshore. Photo: Brian Schumm ...
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