Earth System Science News Archive


#EOAS in the News: Asian Giant ‘Murder Hornets’ Buzz Into U.S. Could they Get to Philly Area?

#EOAS in the News: Asian Giant ‘Murder Hornets’ Buzz Into U.S. Could they Get to Philly Area?

Asian giant hornets will swarm a honeybee hive with the purpose of decapitating thousands of bees and taking away their thoraxes to feed to the hornets’ young. On rare occasions, they will attack humans, sometimes fatally. Stories this week in various media outlets, including the New York ...
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You Can See Clearly, For Now

You Can See Clearly, For Now

By Craig Winston and Matthew Drews Opening Up States Will Reignite Air Pollution The skyline is more visible. The air looks and smells cleaner. There are “before” and “after” pictures of heavily polluted cities like New Delhi and São Paulo’s on the internet. Is the reduction in traffic and ...
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#EOAS in the News: The Coronavirus Hurts Some of Science’s Most Vulnerable

#EOAS in the News: The Coronavirus Hurts Some of Science’s Most Vulnerable

Early-career researchers hang in the balance of coronavirus uncertainty. By Jenessa Duncombe, Eos, Science News by AGU, Staff Writer Daniel Gilford has studied climate science for nearly a decade, and after 2 years as a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University, he felt ready to take the ...
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Algae in the Oceans Often Steal Genes from Bacteria

Algae in the Oceans Often Steal Genes from Bacteria

by Todd Bates Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. The study of 23 species of brown and golden-brown algae, published ...
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Inside the Hutcheson Memorial Forest

Inside the Hutcheson Memorial Forest

By Craig Winston Only 15 minutes from campus, you’ll find the oldest laboratory of its kind at Rutgers and perhaps the country, yet many students and the community are probably unaware of its existence. Off Amwell Road in Somerset County stands the Hutcheson Memorial Forest, listed on the National ...
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How Are the Raritan River and Bay Adapting to Sea Level Rise?

How Are the Raritan River and Bay Adapting to Sea Level Rise?

Laura Reynolds, an EOAS postdoctoral fellow, and team, are conducting pioneering research on carbon and sediment levels of the tidal marshes in the Raritan River and Bay, to better understand and predict how sea level rise will impact these waterways. By Carol Peters The tidal Raritan River, ...
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How Old are Whale Sharks? Nuclear Bomb Legacy Reveals Their Age

How Old are Whale Sharks? Nuclear Bomb Legacy Reveals Their Age

Cold War testing radioactivity used to determine longevity of largest fish on Earth Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. It’s the first time ...
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Oysters and Clams Can be Farmed Together

Oysters and Clams Can be Farmed Together

Rutgers study finds raising multiple species in the same area could benefit shellfish aquaculture Eastern oysters and three species of clams can be farmed together and flourish, potentially boosting profits of shellfish growers, according to a Rutgers University–New Brunswick study. Though diverse ...
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Seeding Research

Seeding Research

Three EOAS grants offer the promise of learning and discovery By Craig Winston The coronavirus crisis has brought the country, if not the world, to a halt, but it can’t completely derail research at the Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS). Two of the three projects ...
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How Stable is Deep Ocean Circulation in Warmer Climate?

How Stable is Deep Ocean Circulation in Warmer Climate?

Altered circulation might have cooled northern areas of North America and Europe If circulation of deep waters in the Atlantic stops or slows due to climate change, it could cause cooling in northern North America and Europe – a scenario that has occurred during past cold glacial periods. Now, a ...
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#EOAS in the News: Coastal Scientists Prepare to Retreat from Field Station Threatened by Rising Seas

#EOAS in the News: Coastal Scientists Prepare to Retreat from Field Station Threatened by Rising Seas

Researchers who study our vulnerable shorelines are moving to higher ground By Jon Hurdle, NJ Spotlight Scientists at a coastal research station that studies how rising sea levels are threatening Shore communities and the environment are preparing to move their work inland to escape worsening ...
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#EOAS in the News: Something in the Air with Tony Broccoli, Rutgers Meteorology Professor

#EOAS in the News: Something in the Air with Tony Broccoli, Rutgers Meteorology Professor

By Joe Martucci, The Press of Atlantic City Meteorologist Joe Martucci chats with his old Rutgers University Meteorologist Professor and current chair of the Department of Environmental Science at Rutgers, Tony Broccoli. Broccoli tells a few stories about his edible last name and what got him ...
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Mother Earth: Another COVID-19 Victim?

Mother Earth: Another COVID-19 Victim?

Two EOAS faculty members describe the ways COVID-19 might impact New Jersey’s waterways and water quality By Carol Peters Looking for hand sanitizer, spray disinfectants, cleaning wipes, paper towels, and toilet paper? You are probably now out of luck. These products and others have already ...
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Heat Stress May Affect More Than 1.2 Billion People Annually by 2100

Heat Stress May Affect More Than 1.2 Billion People Annually by 2100

Rising global temperatures are increasing exposure to extreme heat and humidity Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That’s more than four times the ...
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Climate Change Could Threaten Sea Snails in Mid-Atlantic Waters

Climate Change Could Threaten Sea Snails in Mid-Atlantic Waters

Common whelk live in one of the fastest-warming marine areas, Rutgers-led study says Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk – a type of sea snail – in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. The ...
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Welcome to My World

Welcome to My World

Climate Task Force Keeps Kevin Lyons Bustling By Craig Winston Kevin Lyons is at the epicenter of one of the University’s most ambitious endeavors yet: the quest to develop a comprehensive climate action plan for Rutgers campuses.  Lyons, an associate professor at the Rutgers Business ...
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Front and Center

Pamela McElwee testifies to Congress about climate change’s impact on land By Craig Winston Pamela McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Human Ecology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences and on the faculty of the Rutgers Institute of ...
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Sustainability Town Hall

Sustainability Town Hall

Students, panelists discuss diversity’s role By Craig Winston A vision of how Rutgers might reach sustainability began to take shape when administrators, students and members of the community came together for a Sustainability Town Hall last week. More than 200 people gathered at the College ...
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Global Cooling After Nuclear War Would Harm Ocean Life

Global Cooling After Nuclear War Would Harm Ocean Life

Seafood production also may be impacted by increased acidification A nuclear war that cooled Earth could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, according to the first study of its kind. “We found that the ocean’s chemistry ...
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Scientists Find Far Higher than Expected Rate of Underwater Glacial Melting

Scientists Find Far Higher than Expected Rate of Underwater Glacial Melting

Robotic kayaks were used to track meltwater Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that used robotic kayaks. The findings, which challenge current frameworks for ...
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