Earth System Science News Archive


New Portable Tool Analyzes Microbes in the Environment

New Portable Tool Analyzes Microbes in the Environment

Device could be used to find threats to ecosystems Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms – too tiny to be seen by the naked eye – and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Rutgers researchers ...
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Rutgers Advances Work on Climate Action Plan

Rutgers Advances Work on Climate Action Plan

President’s task force outlines key first steps toward carbon neutrality, climate resilience Rutgers University has taken an important step to develop a Climate Action Plan that will reduce the university’s carbon footprint and its vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. The President’s ...
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Broccoli’s New Book Examines the Impacts of Numerical Models on Climate Change Research

Broccoli’s New Book Examines the Impacts of Numerical Models on Climate Change Research

Co-authored with Syukuro Manabe of Princeton University, EOAS faculty member Anthony Broccoli’s new book “documents Manabe’s scientific journey to a deeper understanding of climate change.” By Craig Winston The timing could not be better. The Democratic political debates are ripe with discussion& ...
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Searching for Climate Change Clues Under the Ocean Floor

Searching for Climate Change Clues Under the Ocean Floor

Postdoc Laura Haynes cruises the world searching for core samples By Craig Winston It’s hard to pinpoint where you might find Laura Haynes, an EOAS post-doctoral fellow, for an interview. During a telephone chat she sounded far away. She explained why in a subsequent email. “I was ...
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LED Lighting in Greenhouses Helps But Standards are Needed

LED Lighting in Greenhouses Helps But Standards are Needed

Rutgers research reveals information gaps on LED lighting for indoor crops While LED lighting can enhance plant growth in greenhouses, standards are needed to determine the optimal intensity and colors of light, according to Rutgers research that could help improve the energy efficiency of ...
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A Postdoc’s Quest to Solve a Climate Mystery

A Postdoc’s Quest to Solve a Climate Mystery

Kyle Mattingly studies a cause for the melting of the all-important Greenland Ice Sheet  By Craig Winston It was late afternoon on Jan. 3, 2000, when an F3-tornado, with wind speeds of about 180 mph, struck Owensboro, Kentucky, a city of about 57,000, leaving hundreds homeless. Kyle ...
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Rising Temperature

Rising Temperature

U.N. Climate Change Conference brought no breakthroughs, just concerns By Craig Winston Citing rising temperatures, shrinking ice caps, and excessive greenhouse gases, international leaders in the fight against climate change spoke both defiantly and dispiritedly at a conference in Madrid about ...
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New EOAS Faculty Member Rebecca Jackson Researches Ocean/Glacier Interactions

New EOAS Faculty Member Rebecca Jackson Researches Ocean/Glacier Interactions

By Mary Ellen Dowd  Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS) faculty member  Rebecca Jackson is a physical oceanographer with specialized interests in ocean-glacier interactions, coastal dynamics, and polar processes. Her research focuses on the underwater ...
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Climate Change is Reshaping Communities of Ocean Organisms

Climate Change is Reshaping Communities of Ocean Organisms

Warm-water species are rapidly increasing and cold-water species are decreasing Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, ...
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Meet new EOAS Faculty Member, Andrea Marston, Ph.D.

Meet new EOAS Faculty Member, Andrea Marston, Ph.D.

Andrea Marston joins the faculty of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS) and Rutgers Geography as an Assistant Professor following the completion of her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She has a BA from Duke University and an MA in Geography from the ...
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EOAS Faculty Member Nicholas Beaird Focuses on the Physics of High-Latitude Oceans

EOAS Faculty Member Nicholas Beaird Focuses on the Physics of High-Latitude Oceans

By Carol Peters Beaird seeks to understand small and regional processes that have a global impact on ocean circulation and climate.  “Understanding some key small-scale processes that transfer heat and salt between the polar oceans, ice sheets, and the atmosphere,” are the research focus of ...
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EOAS Faculty Member Juliane Gross Opens Lunar Samples Collected by Apollo 17 Nearly 50 Years Ago

EOAS Faculty Member Juliane Gross Opens Lunar Samples Collected by Apollo 17 Nearly 50 Years Ago

NASA scientists opened an untouched rock and soil sample from the Moon returned to Earth on Apollo 17, marking the first time in more than 40 years a pristine sample of rock and regolith from the Apollo era has been opened. It sets the stage for scientists to practice techniques to study future ...
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Josh Kohut Named Fellow of Marine Technology Society

Josh Kohut Named Fellow of Marine Technology Society

Josh Kohut, professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, was named a Fellow of the Marine Technology Society (MTS). He was recognized for fundamental contributions in the development of novel technologies that allow for the sampling of marine systems.  Kohut has been at the ...
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Marine Ecologist Malin Pinsky Selected as one of Science News’ Top Scientists to Watch in 2019

For the fifth year in a row, the award-winning magazine, Science News, is recognizing young stars—all under the age of 40—across scientific disciplines, from genetics to astrochemistry, from quantum mechanics to climate change. By recognizing their work now in a feature highlighting 10 early- and ...
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Robert Chant awarded CERF’s 2019 Pritchard Award

Robert Chant awarded CERF’s 2019 Pritchard Award

Congratulations to Dr. Bob Chant on winning the Coastal & Estuarine Research Federation’s 2019 Pitchard Award. This award was established to honor Dr. Donald W. Pritchard, whose insightful research on the physical dynamics of coastal systems set the stage for much of the research in ...
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Samantha Bova wins L’Oréal USA For Women in Science Fellowship

Samantha Bova wins L’Oréal USA For Women in Science Fellowship

The L’Oréal USA For Women in Science fellowship program awards five women postdoctoral scientists annually with grants of $60,000 each for their contributions in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields and commitment to serving as role models for younger generations. The program is ...
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Red Algae Thrive Despite Ancestor’s Massive Loss of Genes

Red Algae Thrive Despite Ancestor’s Massive Loss of Genes

Study may spawn ways to genetically alter and control red seaweeds You’d think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi. An ancestor of red algae lost about a quarter of its genes roughly one billion ...
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Is Theory on Earth’s Climate in the Last 15 Million Years Wrong?

Is Theory on Earth’s Climate in the Last 15 Million Years Wrong?

Rutgers-led study casts doubt on Himalayan rock weathering hypothesis A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study in the journal Nature ...
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Soils Could Be Affected by Climate Change, Impacting Water and Food

Soils Could Be Affected by Climate Change, Impacting Water and Food

Rutgers-led study shows how increased rainfall can reduce water infiltration in soils Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. Climate change may reduce the ability of soils to absorb water in many parts ...
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Seeking the Origins of Life in Antarctica

Seeking the Origins of Life in Antarctica

DEENR Post Doc Mansha Seth-Pasricha seeks clues to the origins of life in Antarctica, where the environment is similar to that of Earth millions of years ago.  By Lessley Delcid and Walker Perry In 2015, Mansha Seth-Pasricha, a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Ecology, ...
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