Earth System Science News Archive


Nuclear Winter Would Threaten Nearly Everyone on Earth

Nuclear Winter Would Threaten Nearly Everyone on Earth

Second study of its kind confirms extreme impacts from U.S. vs. Russia nuclear war  If the United States and Russia waged an all-out nuclear war, much of the land in the Northern Hemisphere would be below freezing in the summertime, with the growing season slashed by nearly 90 percent in some, ...
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Study Finds Big Increase in Ocean Carbon Dioxide Absorption Along West Antarctic Peninsula

Study Finds Big Increase in Ocean Carbon Dioxide Absorption Along West Antarctic Peninsula

Long-term measurements reveal links between climate change and ocean carbon dynamics Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a Rutgers-led study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run. The ...
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Could Duckweed Feed the World?

Could Duckweed Feed the World?

Rutgers professor is at the forefront of duckweed farming research Climate change is threatening the world’s food supply and the risk of supply disruptions is expected to grow as temperatures rise, according to a new United Nations report co-authored by Rutgers human ecology professor ...
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Three EOAS Faculty Members Quoted in the Washington Post: New Jersey is one of the Fastest-Warming States

Three EOAS Faculty Members Quoted in the Washington Post: New Jersey is one of the Fastest-Warming States

N.J. is one of the fastest-warming states in the U.S., according to a Washington Post article titled “2°C: BEYOND THE LIMIT: Extreme climate change has arrived in America.”   EOAS faculty members Anthony Broccoli, Dina Fonseca, and David Robinson are quoted in the ...
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Scientists Discover Key Factors in How Some Algae Harness Solar Energy

Scientists Discover Key Factors in How Some Algae Harness Solar Energy

Rutgers-led research could help lead to more efficient and affordable algal biofuels Scientists have discovered how diatoms – a type of alga that produce 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen – harness solar energy for photosynthesis. The Rutgers University-led discovery, published in the journal ...
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Lena Struwe Receives American Society of Plant Taxonomists’ 2019 Peter Raven Award for Exceptional Outreach to Non-Scientists

Lena Struwe Receives American Society of Plant Taxonomists’ 2019 Peter Raven Award for Exceptional Outreach to Non-Scientists

The American Society of Plant Taxonomists (ASPT) announced that Lena Struwe, professor and director of the Chrysler Herbarium at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences has been selected as the 2019 recipient of the Peter Raven award. The award is named for Peter Raven, ...
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Mega-Cloud from Canadian Wildfires Will Help Model Impacts of Nuclear War

Mega-Cloud from Canadian Wildfires Will Help Model Impacts of Nuclear War

British Columbia wildfires in 2017 created a massive cloud that circled the Northern Hemisphere Extreme wildfires in British Columbia, Canada, pumped so much smoke into the upper atmosphere in August 2017 that an enormous cloud circled most of the Northern Hemisphere – a finding in the& ...
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How Quickly Are Glaciers Melting? TIME Speaks With EOAS’ Rebecca Jackson

How Quickly Are Glaciers Melting? TIME Speaks With EOAS’ Rebecca Jackson

EOAS faculty member Rebecca Jackson’s recent research, published in the journal Science, is covered by TIME in a story titled “Glaciers Are Melting Underwater. It’s Worse Than Previously Thought.” Jackson told TIME, “The existing theory is wildly inaccurate at one glacier . . . ...
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“Legacy” Mercury Pollution Still a Problem in New Jersey Meadowlands Waters

“Legacy” Mercury Pollution Still a Problem in New Jersey Meadowlands Waters

Rutgers-led study shows the impact of decades-old upstream contamination “Legacy” mercury pollution from decades ago and miles away is an important source of contamination in New Jersey Meadowlands waterways, according to a Rutgers-led study that could help guide cleanup efforts. The study in ...
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Algae-Killing Viruses Spur Nutrient Recycling in Oceans

Algae-Killing Viruses Spur Nutrient Recycling in Oceans

Rutgers-led team confirms an important role for viruses that infect algae in marine waters Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to ...
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Red Algae Steal Genes from Bacteria to Cope with Environmental Stresses

Red Algae Steal Genes from Bacteria to Cope with Environmental Stresses

Research could lead to designer algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicals It’s a case of grand larceny that could lead to new fuels and cleanup chemicals. Ten species of red algae stole about 1 percent of their genes from bacteria to cope with toxic metals and salt stress in hot springs, ...
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Addressing Sea-Level Rise in New Jersey: EOAS Experts at the Forefront of Cutting-Edge Solutions

Addressing Sea-Level Rise in New Jersey: EOAS Experts at the Forefront of Cutting-Edge Solutions

The rate of sea-level rise in New Jersey is higher than the global average, and yet how is the state preparing its residents and coastline for the impact of a rising ocean? Since Superstorm Sandy struck in 2012, how much has New Jersey done to adapt and prepare for another severe storm or? ...
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How to Protect Corals Facing Climate Change

How to Protect Corals Facing Climate Change

Conserving a wide range of coral habitats is the best strategy The best way to protect corals threatened by climate change is to conserve a wide range of their habitats, according to a study in Nature Climate Change. The finding likely applies to conservation efforts ...
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Climate Change Threatens Commercial Fishers From Maine to North Carolina

Climate Change Threatens Commercial Fishers From Maine to North Carolina

Rutgers researchers and other scientists document the impact of ocean warming on fisheries Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine are projected to face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, ...
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Warming Waters in Western Tropical Pacific May Affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Warming Waters in Western Tropical Pacific May Affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Rutgers study finds weather patterns that may influence global sea-level rise Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a ...
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How is Climate Change Affecting New Jersey?

How is Climate Change Affecting New Jersey?

EOAS Director Dr. Robert Kopp recently contributed to a special piece on NJTV about New Jersey’s climate change threats. The full article can be found here. ...
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Striped Maple Trees Often Change Sexes, With Females More Likely to Die

Striped Maple Trees Often Change Sexes, With Females More Likely to Die

Rutgers study shows how switching sexes could threaten populations Although pollen has covered cars for weeks and allergy sufferers have been sneezing, we think of sex as being the realm of animals. But plant sex can be quite interesting, especially in species that can have male or female flowers. ...
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Iceland Volcano Eruption in 1783-84 Did Not Spawn Extreme Heat Wave

Iceland Volcano Eruption in 1783-84 Did Not Spawn Extreme Heat Wave

Massive Laki volcano eruption led to unusually cold winter in Europe, Rutgers-led study says An enormous volcanic eruption on Iceland in 1783-84 did not cause an extreme summer heat wave in Europe. But, as Benjamin Franklin speculated, the eruption triggered an unusually cold winter, according to ...
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From Ocean Currents to Theoretical Particles: Three Rutgers Students Receive Goldwater Scholarships

From Ocean Currents to Theoretical Particles: Three Rutgers Students Receive Goldwater Scholarships

Rutgers marks its 14th consecutive year of Goldwater scholarship recipients Mariya Galochkina wants to study the ancient roots of climate change. She is fascinated by how the Earth’s systems are so interconnected and wants to know more about how each has impacted the global climate. “I want to ...
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With Flower Preferences, Bees Have a Big Gap Between the Sexes

With Flower Preferences, Bees Have a Big Gap Between the Sexes

Female and male bees of the same species frequent different flowers, Rutgers-led study finds For scores of wild bee species, females and males visit very different flowers for food – a discovery that could be important for conservation efforts, according to Rutgers-led research. Indeed, the diets ...
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