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Video Gallery

Rutgers Library

Public Videos for EOAS

If you are an authorized student or a faculty member, you can access our private video library here.

April 5th, 2017

Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140

Kim Stanley Robinson, NY Times Best Selling Author

Novelist Kim Stanley Robinson reads from and discusses his novel, New York 2140, which presents a vision of New York in a future of extreme sea-level rise. After his talk, Robinson is joined by a panel of distinguished Rutgers faculty with expertise in climate science (Robert Kopp), urban planning (Clinton Andrews), urban agriculture (Laura Lawson), and the environmental humanities (Jorge Marcone)​.


March 2nd, 2017

Past, Present, and Future of Glacier Archives from the World’s Highest Mountains

Dr. Lonnie G. Thompson, The Ohio State University

Dr. Lonnie G. Thompson, from the School of Earth Sciences and Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center at Ohio State University, presented this public lecture as a Distinguished Speaker for Rutgers’ Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

Glaciers serve both as recorders and early indicators of climate change. The ongoing widespread melting of high-elevation glaciers and ice caps, particularly in low to middle latitudes, provide strong evidence that a large-scale, pervasive and, in some cases, rapid change in Earth’s climate system is underway. Glacier shrinkage during the 20th and 21st centuries has been observed all over the world, including the South American Andes, the Himalayas, equatorial Africa (e.g. Kilimanjaro) and near Puncak Jaya, Indonesia (New Guinea). The history and fate of these glaciers, as well as new geo-hazards created by their recent retreat, provide a global perspective for contemporary climate changes and aid in our understanding of such changes in the future.


October 27, 2016

Coasts in Times of Sea-Level Rise

Dr. Robert Kopp, Rutgers University (EPS/EOAS) (EOAS Fall Seminar Series)

Around the world, sea levels are rising in response to warming oceans, melting glaciers, and shrinking ice sheets – and even faster rise is projected in the coming century. In this talk, Prof. Kopp, from the Rutgers University Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, explores the forces driving sea-level rise, insights into future changes from the geological record of past changes, and implications for the future risks of flooding along the shore.


September 13th, 2016

Environmental Biophysics and Molecular Energy Program: Light to Life

Dr. Paul G. Falkowski, Rutgers University (DMCS/EOAS)

All life on Earth is based on electron transfer reactions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this talk, I argue that photogeochemical reactions of minerals were transformational in the origins and persistence of biologically catalyzed electron transfer reactions on Earth.

Increasingly high resolution protein structures provide an opportunity to glimpse into the deep past and examine the basic motifs that have been utilized repeatedly over time. In this talk, I will examine the origins of biologically catalyzed electron transfer (redox) reactions, which form the basis of all life on Earth, and focus on the evolution of the structures responsible for these reactions. The structural analyses of extant oxidorectases provide clues as to how the earliest life forms evolved increasingly intricate bioelectronic devices. Further, I will explore how photobiochemical reactions potentially evolved to provide the long-term power supply for life by experimental analyses of the photochemical reactivity of common minerals. Around the world, sea levels are rising in response to warming oceans, melting glaciers, and shrinking ice sheets – and even faster rise is projected in the coming century. In this talk, Prof. Kopp, from the Rutgers University Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, explores the forces driving sea-level rise, insights into future changes from the geological record of past changes, and implications for the future risks of flooding along the shore.


February 17th, 2016

The Next HyperThermal: Climate Dynamics Lessons Learned from the Study of Past Warm Climates

Dr. Matthew Huber, Purdue University, University of New Hampshire

Global climate model simulations are used to investigate global circulation patterns and other changes to the climate system that might be observed on a much warmer Earth.


February 9, 2016

Climate Change and Energy: How Can Justice Be Achieved For Young People and Nature?

Dr. James E. Hansen (Columbia – Special seminar speaker)


December 9th, 2015

Groundwater in Extreme Environments, Lessons from the Atacama

Dr. Linda Godfrey, Cornell University


December 7th, 2015

Sediment Flux, Climate and Landscape Evolution in Unglaciated Terrain

Dr. Josh Roering, University of Oregon


November 18th, 2015

Pyzza and Programming II

Dr. Bryan Raney, Rutgers University (DES)

This presentation covers a few practical examples of data analysis techniques in atmospheric and environmental sciences. Presented by Bryan Raney as part of the informal “Pizza and Programming” seminar series at the Department of Environmental Sciences. (Part 2 of 2)

The recording of the presentation was sponsored by EOAS.


November 4th, 2015

Pyzza and Programming I

Dr. Bryan Raney, Rutgers University (DES)

A presentation of the essentials of Python installation, syntax, and basic modules and commands for data input/output and plotting. Presented by Bryan Raney as part of the informal “Pizza and Programming” seminar series at the Department of Environmental Sciences. (Part 1 of 2)

The recording of the presentation was sponsored by EOAS.


October 7th, 2015

Using the Past to Predict the Future of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

Dr. Robert De Conto, University of Massachusetts – Amherst