News & Announcements


David Robinson
Dec
18
2019

Rising Temperature

U.N. Climate Change Conference brought no breakthroughs, just concerns By Craig Winston Citing rising temperatures, shrinking ice caps, and excessive greenhouse gases, international leaders in the fight...




Upcoming Seminars & Special Events

January 2020
Sat, Jan 25th
Wed, Jan 29th
11:45 am - 12:45 pm EPS Colloquium

  • Dustin Trail

    Dr. Dustin Trail is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. His research is mainly laboratory-based and seeks to understand: (i) the evolution of planetary magmas through time;(ii) the conditions of early Earth and implications for the inception of the biosphere;(iii) secular changes in the oxidation state of magmas and fluids, and the connection between the chemical state of the crust and mantle; and (iv)non-traditional mechanisms of isotope fractionation. More Information about Dr. Trail

    Dustin Trail

    Dr. Dustin Trail is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. His research is mainly laboratory-based and seeks to understand: (i) the evolution of planetary magmas through time;(ii) the conditions of early Earth and implications for the inception of the biosphere;(iii) secular changes in the oxidation state of magmas and fluids, and the connection between the chemical state of the crust and mantle; and (iv)non-traditional mechanisms of isotope fractionation. More Information about Dr. Trail

Fri, Jan 31st
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Environmental Sciences Seminar:
What Are Eddy Fluxes? Biological and Chemical Feedbacks from (and to) the Ocean

  • David Lindo-Atichati

    Dr. David Lindo-Atichati is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering and Environmental Science at the City University of New York. His work, in conjunction with an international network of collaborators, grapples with questions at the frontiers of physics, biology, and chemistry in the oceanic systems. He approaches these questions from a multidimensional perspective that includes theory, observation, and modeling. By weaving these three approaches together, his research program is specifically designed to understand the interactions between oceanic circulation, marine ecosystems, and marine pollutants. He rigorously tests predictions of the models he uses with observations collected in the ocean. This research involves marine instrumentation, advanced computational methods, and visualization tools to address fundamental questions at the interface of oceanography and environmental engineering. More Information about Dr. Lindo-Atichati

    David Lindo-Atichati

    Dr. David Lindo-Atichati is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering and Environmental Science at the City University of New York. His work, in conjunction with an international network of collaborators, grapples with questions at the frontiers of physics, biology, and chemistry in the oceanic systems. He approaches these questions from a multidimensional perspective that includes theory, observation, and modeling. By weaving these three approaches together, his research program is specifically designed to understand the interactions between oceanic circulation, marine ecosystems, and marine pollutants. He rigorously tests predictions of the models he uses with observations collected in the ocean. This research involves marine instrumentation, advanced computational methods, and visualization tools to address fundamental questions at the interface of oceanography and environmental engineering. More Information about Dr. Lindo-Atichati

February 2020
Wed, Feb 5th
11:45 am - 12:45 pm EPS Colloquium

  • Sean Kinney

    Sean Kinney is a Graduate Student in the Dept of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University. More Information about Sean

    Sean Kinney

    Sean Kinney is a Graduate Student in the Dept of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University. More Information about Sean

Thu, Feb 6th
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm E&E Grad Program Seminar

  • Thomas Grothues

    Dr. Thomas Grothues is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. He is interested in the abundance and distribution of fishes as responses to physical factors. These responses include those that could be considered involuntary, such as distribution of larvae by ocean currents and mortality or loss of reproductive capacity in unsuitable environments. Responses also include those that are voluntary (behavioral), such as migration, ranging, and sheltering (including burial). The physical factors that he investigates as impacts include natural and anthropogenic perturbations such as restoration efforts, urbanization of water fronts, seasonal and inter-annual water quality fluctuations and ocean structure. Dr. Grothues is also a faculty member of EOAS.

    Thomas Grothues

    Dr. Thomas Grothues is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. He is interested in the abundance and distribution of fishes as responses to physical factors. These responses include those that could be considered involuntary, such as distribution of larvae by ocean currents and mortality or loss of reproductive capacity in unsuitable environments. Responses also include those that are voluntary (behavioral), such as migration, ranging, and sheltering (including burial). The physical factors that he investigates as impacts include natural and anthropogenic perturbations such as restoration efforts, urbanization of water fronts, seasonal and inter-annual water quality fluctuations and ocean structure. Dr. Grothues is also a faculty member of EOAS.

Fri, Feb 7th
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Environmental Sciences Seminar:
How Water Vapor Turns Ice into Liquid: Atmospheric River Impacts on Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Mass Balance

  • Kyle Mattingly

    Dr. Kyle Mattingly is a climate scientist whose primary research focus is on interactions between the atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans that control the evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. His past work has shown that episodes of intense atmospheric water vapor transport, known as atmospheric rivers, lead to increased melting of the ice sheet surface when they occur over Greenland during summer. He is currently working with a team of EOAS faculty mentors to assess the ability of global climate models to simulate atmospheric rivers and their coupled ocean-atmosphere drivers, with the goal of improving projections of future sea level rise from Greenland melt.

    Kyle completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Georgia and his B.S. in Meteorology at Western Kentucky University. In addition to his Greenland Ice Sheet research, he is interested in a number of other aspects of climate and its intersections with other earth system components. He has led or collaborated on research into the atmospheric circulation patterns controlling precipitation variability in subtropical South America, the effect of rain gauge network density on expected extreme precipitation return periods in the Colorado Front Range region, and the potential impact of ice sheet meltwater runoff on phytoplankton primary productivity in the Labrador Sea, among other topics. Kyle is a current EOAS Postdoctoral Awardee.

    Kyle Mattingly

    Dr. Kyle Mattingly is a climate scientist whose primary research focus is on interactions between the atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans that control the evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. His past work has shown that episodes of intense atmospheric water vapor transport, known as atmospheric rivers, lead to increased melting of the ice sheet surface when they occur over Greenland during summer. He is currently working with a team of EOAS faculty mentors to assess the ability of global climate models to simulate atmospheric rivers and their coupled ocean-atmosphere drivers, with the goal of improving projections of future sea level rise from Greenland melt.

    Kyle completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Georgia and his B.S. in Meteorology at Western Kentucky University. In addition to his Greenland Ice Sheet research, he is interested in a number of other aspects of climate and its intersections with other earth system components. He has led or collaborated on research into the atmospheric circulation patterns controlling precipitation variability in subtropical South America, the effect of rain gauge network density on expected extreme precipitation return periods in the Colorado Front Range region, and the potential impact of ice sheet meltwater runoff on phytoplankton primary productivity in the Labrador Sea, among other topics. Kyle is a current EOAS Postdoctoral Awardee.

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