Nuclear War Would Cause a Global Famine and Kill Billions, Rutgers-Led Study Finds

Even a nuclear conflict between new nuclear states would decimate crop production and result in widespread starvation More than 5 billion people would die of hunger following a full-scale nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia, according to a global study led by Rutgers climate scientists that estimates post-conflict crop production. “The data tell us one thing: We must prevent a nuclear …

Cultivating Super Corals Alone Is Unlikely to Protect Coral Reefs From Climate Change

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Restoration efforts need to be conducted at much greater spatial and temporal scales to have long-term benefits A popular coral restoration technique is unlikely to protect coral reefs from climate change and is based on the assumption that local threats to reefs are managed effectively, according to a study co-authored by Rutgers, Coral Research Alliance and researchers at other institutions. …

Addressing Food Insecurity in New Jersey

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By Carol Peters Rutgers University Faculty members and students have contributed to two recent reports that provide recommendations to help to help state and local governments, schools, childcare providers, community-based and faith-based organizations, emergency food providers, and others, to help mitigate hunger across the state. More must be done to alleviate food insecurity in New Jersey, argues a new report, Hunger …

SEBS Faculty Win Rutgers Global Grants

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SEBS faculty, representing a broad range of majors and programs at the school, were awarded 2022 Rutgers Global Grants, annual seed grants open to all Rutgers faculty, including tenured, tenure-track, clinical, and non-tenure track faculty.   These grants help to support a strong core of SEBS faculty who are dedicated to international research and collaborations. This international component to SEBS research and …

Rutgers Researcher Uses Genomics and Gene Editing to Help Save Coral Reefs

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Debashish Bhattacharya, a professor at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, aims to identify the genes believed to be involved in coral bleaching. A Rutgers researcher who has been recognized for trying to save dying coral reefs will examine their genetic makeup to try to pinpoint the genes involved in coral bleaching caused by climate change, which could have …

NOAA Launches New Marine Species Mapping Tool Developed in Collaboration with Rutgers

Scientists conduct a trawl survey off the coast of New England. (NOAA)

NOAA Fisheries has launched the Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal, a new tool developed in collaboration with the Global Change Ecology and Evolution Lab at Rutgers University, to better track the location and movement of marine fish in U.S. waters. An interactive website, this tool reveals that the ranges of many marine species are shifting, expanding and contracting in response to changing ocean …

How You Can Help Mobilize Rutgers for Climate Action

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Registration is open for the May 4 event Mobilizing the University for Climate Transformation As Rutgers advances a climate action plan, which includes a university commitment to achieve carbon neutrality by 2040, President Jonathan Holloway and the Office of Climate Action are inviting the university community to help develop and advance equitable climate solutions and to contribute to the decarbonization of Rutgers, New …

New Jersey’s Temperatures Rise by 4 Degrees Fahrenheit, Twice the Global Average Since 1900

Boyd Park, submerged under flood water from the Raritan River in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Ida.

Heavy rainfall, flooding, increasing heat waves and heat-related illness are likely to become more common in New Jersey by 2100, according to a report by researchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick, the Office of the New Jersey State Climatologist and the University of Delaware. State of the Climate: New Jersey 2021 is an annual overview for state and local decision-makers, hazard planning …

Climate Change Will Reshuffle Marine Ecosystems in Unexpected Ways, Rutgers Study Finds

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Sophisticated model reveals how predator-prey relationships affect species’ ranges. Warming of the oceans due to climate change will mean fewer productive fish species to catch in the future, according to a new Rutgers study that found as temperatures warm, predator-prey interactions will prevent species from keeping up with the conditions where they could thrive. The new study, published in the journal Proceedings of …

Rutgers “Earth Day Every Day!” Spring 2022 Begins April 25

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Rutgers Cooperative Extension’s “Earth Day, Every Day” educational webinar series is back this spring in a different format. Open to the public, these free sessions focus on steps everyone can take to protect the environment. We can all do our part to make our homes more sustainable, from controlling invasive pests to collecting environmental data to protecting the local watershed. …