DES Seminar:
Transgenerational Effects of Low-Dose, Perinatal Exposure of rats to Zeranol on Sexual Development, Reproduction, and Susceptibility to Mammary Carcinogenesis

Date

Dec 06 2019

Time

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Location

Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Bldg. Room 223
14 College Farm Rd. New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Speaker(s)

  • Helmut Zarbl

    Dr. Helmut Zarbl serves as the Director of the NIEHS sponsored Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease. He is also the Associate Director For Public Health Sciences at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. He serves on numerous national research review and advisory panels, and editorial panels.. Dr. Zarbl is known for his work in areas of toxicogenomics, and mechanisms of and genetic susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis, mechanisms of mutagenesis and toxicity, and technology development. These research efforts have to date resulted in over 70 scientific papers and book chapters. More Information about Dr. Zarbl

    Helmut Zarbl

    Dr. Helmut Zarbl serves as the Director of the NIEHS sponsored Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease. He is also the Associate Director For Public Health Sciences at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. He serves on numerous national research review and advisory panels, and editorial panels.. Dr. Zarbl is known for his work in areas of toxicogenomics, and mechanisms of and genetic susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis, mechanisms of mutagenesis and toxicity, and technology development. These research efforts have to date resulted in over 70 scientific papers and book chapters. More Information about Dr. Zarbl

Abstract: 

Zeranol (Zer) is a semi-synthetic derivative of Zearalenone, a myco-estrogen produced by Fusarium fungi, that is used in livestock to enhance meat production. Zer from implants is detectable in meat, is stable at cooking temperatures and has a long half-life of ~22 hours in humans. Our studies in prepubescent girls indicated that human exposure occurs via the consumption of beef and popcorn, and urinary levels of Zer are associated with altered onset of puberty, height and weight. To determine the effects of perinatal exposure, developing progeny were exposed via the maternal diet between GD-7 to GD21 and every third day PND-7 through weaning. The maternal dose of 0.625 μg/kg/day corresponded half the human ADI (1.25μg/kg/day). Perinatal exposure of F1 progeny resulted in precocious puberty in females F1 progeny, defined by a decrease in mean age at vaginal opening and altered estrus cycling. F1 males showed feminization as assessed by decreased ano-genital distance and decreased sperm counts. F1 females treated with a single dose of carcinogen showed decreased latency and increased incidence of mammary tumors. Similar effects on both male and female sexual development and carcinogenesis were observed in the F2 progeny, but only if both the dam and the sire were perinatally exposed to Zer, suggesting a recessive, epigenetic mode of transmission. F3 progeny showed decreased fecundity and litter sizes, with a significant decrease in the number of males. F3 females also retain an increased susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis. These studies suggest that perinatal exposure to Zer produces transgenerational effects on sexual development and susceptibility to carcinogenesis.


Date

Dec 06 2019

Time

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Location

Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Bldg. Room 223
14 College Farm Rd. New Brunswick, NJ 08901
X

Organizer

Dept of Environmental Sciences
Website
http://envsci.rutgers.edu/index.php