#EOAS in the News: Asian Giant ‘Murder Hornets’ Buzz Into U.S. Could they Get to Philly Area?

Asian giant hornets will swarm a honeybee hive with the purpose of decapitating thousands of bees and taking away their thoraxes to feed to the hornets’ young. On rare occasions, they will attack humans, sometimes fatally. Stories this week in various media outlets, including the New York Times, about the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, making its way to Washington state have …

Inside the Hutcheson Memorial Forest

Mettler's Woods, Photo by Matthew Drews/Rutgers University

By Craig Winston Only 15 minutes from campus, you’ll find the oldest laboratory of its kind at Rutgers and perhaps the country, yet many students and the community are probably unaware of its existence. Off Amwell Road in Somerset County stands the Hutcheson Memorial Forest, listed on the National Park Registry of Natural Landmarks, whose 500 acres of forest and …

How Are the Raritan River and Bay Adapting to Sea Level Rise?

Julie Blum, in the New Jersey jungle, Phragmites marsh, Raritan River, NJ. Photo courtesy of Laura Reynolds

Laura Reynolds, an EOAS postdoctoral fellow, and team, are conducting pioneering research on carbon and sediment levels of the tidal marshes in the Raritan River and Bay, to better understand and predict how sea level rise will impact these waterways. By Carol Peters The tidal Raritan River, once dubbed the “Queen of Rivers” in a poem published in the London Review in 1806, …

Oysters and Clams Can be Farmed Together

Rutgers study finds raising multiple species in the same area could benefit shellfish aquaculture Eastern oysters and three species of clams can be farmed together and flourish, potentially boosting profits of shellfish growers, according to a Rutgers University–New Brunswick study. Though diverse groups of species often outperform single-species groups, most bivalve farms in the United States and around the world grow their …

#EOAS in the News: Coastal Scientists Prepare to Retreat from Field Station Threatened by Rising Seas

Researchers who study our vulnerable shorelines are moving to higher ground By Jon Hurdle, NJ Spotlight Scientists at a coastal research station that studies how rising sea levels are threatening Shore communities and the environment are preparing to move their work inland to escape worsening flooding and erosion on an isolated peninsula near Tuckerton. The Rutgers University Marine Field Station …

#EOAS in the News: Something in the Air with Tony Broccoli, Rutgers Meteorology Professor

By Joe Martucci, The Press of Atlantic City Meteorologist Joe Martucci chats with his old Rutgers University Meteorologist Professor and current chair of the Department of Environmental Science at Rutgers, Tony Broccoli. Broccoli tells a few stories about his edible last name and what got him interested in the weather (2:45). He then discusses how he made the career move …

Mother Earth: Another COVID-19 Victim?

Two EOAS faculty members describe the ways COVID-19 might impact New Jersey’s waterways and water quality By Carol Peters Looking for hand sanitizer, spray disinfectants, cleaning wipes, paper towels, and toilet paper? You are probably now out of luck. These products and others have already disappeared from stores all over New Jersey. As global nations work to block transmission of …

Sustainability Town Hall

Students, panelists discuss diversity’s role By Craig Winston A vision of how Rutgers might reach sustainability began to take shape when administrators, students and members of the community came together for a Sustainability Town Hall last week. More than 200 people gathered at the College Avenue Student Center to hear six panelists in an open forum about sustainability and the ravages of …

How is Climate Change Affecting New Jersey?

EOAS Director Dr. Robert Kopp recently contributed to a special piece on NJTV about New Jersey’s climate change threats. The full article can be found here.