On the Banks of a Pristine Raritan River

Rutgers Cooperative Extension faculty member Michele Bakacs is leading an effort to study pathogens in the Raritan River, aiming to ensure the river eventually meets fishable and swimmable standards in New Jersey and becomes a resource that is cherished and celebrated.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension faculty member Michele Bakacs is leading an effort to study pathogens in the Raritan River, aiming to ensure the river eventually meets fishable and swimmable standards in New Jersey and becomes a resource that is cherished and celebrated.  By Carol Heher Peters On a sweltering day in May, Rutgers students gather on the banks of the sparkling Raritan River and …

How Rocks Rusted on Earth and Turned Red

The colorful banded Tepees are part of the Blue Mesa Member, a geological feature about 220 million to 225 million years old in the Chinle Formation in Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona. Photo: NPS

Important phenomenon could help assess future climate change How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A Rutgers-led study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were high enough to be a model for what our planet may be like …

#EOAS in the News: How Snowy will this Winter Be? David Robinson Weighs In

#EOAS in the News: How Snowy will this Winter Be? David Robinson Weighs In

La Niña will be strong during the upcoming winter, so does this mean New Jersey will get more than the average amount of snow this year? EOAS faculty member and N.J. State Climatologist David Robinson told The Star Ledger (nj.com) in the article La Niña has strengthened, what this means for N.J. this winter, “snow is awfully difficult to predict, as …

#EOAS in the News: Ximing Guo speaks to Science Magazine about the Impact of Genomics on Aquaculture

Science Magazine interviewed EOAS faculty member Ximing Guo for the article “New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect” published Nov. 19, 2020

Science Magazine interviewed EOAS faculty member Ximing Guo for the article “New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect” published Nov. 19, 2020 Guo is a Professor at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Rutgers Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. His primary research interests are the biology, genetics, and evolution of marine mollusks, and marine aquaculture. He is interested …

Helping Shape Rutgers’ Climate Commitment

Amid an extraordinary year altered by the coronavirus pandemic, work continues at Rutgers University to address another ongoing crisis with dire consequences: climate change. Following the release of an interim report, the President’s Task Force on Carbon Neutrality and Climate Resilience is continuing its work on a comprehensive climate action plan for the university.

Amid an extraordinary year altered by the coronavirus pandemic, work continues at Rutgers University to address another ongoing crisis with dire consequences: climate change. Following the release of an interim report, the President’s Task Force on Carbon Neutrality and Climate Resilience is continuing its work on a comprehensive climate action plan for the university.  As the task force develops Rutgers’ strategies for contributing …

#EOAS in the News: “To Stabilize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First”

In an op-ed in the Star Ledger titled “To Stablize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First,” EOAS Director Robert Kopp wrote,

In an op-ed in the Star Ledger titled “To Stablize Climate We Must Fix Democracy First,” EOAS Director Robert Kopp wrote,  “Barring extraordinary new technologies to hasten the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, most of the warming we are causing will last for millennia. So we need not only to act decisively to decarbonize the global economy but …

#EOAS in the News: Bat Ticks Discovered in NJ for the First Time

94.3 The Point reports on Rutgers research on the newly discovered bat tick’s presence in New Jersey and quotes EOAS faculty member Dina Fonseca and doctoral student James Occi.

In this interview with 94.3 The Point, #EOAS faculty member Dina Fonseca and Rutgers Ph.D. student James Occi explain that they have found ticks that prey on bats in New Jersey, specifically in Mercer and Sussex counties. In this interview, Fonseca and Occi explain that people who have had bats removed from indoors should be aware that without the bats …

Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

Coastal flooding in Tuckerton, New Jersey, from a storm off the East Coast in October 2019. Such flooding, which occurred during a high tide, is expected to increase as a result of sea-level rise. Image: Life on the Edge Drones

It’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight inequality will affect future trends Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. Between 2012 and 2015, 10,392 acres in the …

Bacteria Can Defuse Dangerous Chemical In Passaic River

Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists.

Rutgers study suggests pollutant’s toxicity could be decreased. Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists. Their research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, needs further work to realize the full …

#EOAS in the News: July, 2020 Hottest on Record

July 2020 was the hottest month in New Jersey in 125 years of record keeping, EOAS faculty member David Robinson, who is also the New Jersey State Climatologist, told the Bergen Record in an article titled “July was the hottest month on record in New Jersey — but you figured that already, right?“ Robinson said it was the persistence of …