Scientists Believe Evolution Could Save Coral Reefs, If We Let It

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Research shows protecting “hot reefs” is key to saving coral reefs. Coral reefs can adapt to climate change if given the chance to evolve, according to a study led by Coral Reef Alliance, Rutgers University, the University of Washington and other institutions. The recent study, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, finds that coral reefs can evolve and adapt …

Cultivating Super Corals Alone Is Unlikely to Protect Coral Reefs From Climate Change

coral

Restoration efforts need to be conducted at much greater spatial and temporal scales to have long-term benefits A popular coral restoration technique is unlikely to protect coral reefs from climate change and is based on the assumption that local threats to reefs are managed effectively, according to a study co-authored by Rutgers, Coral Research Alliance and researchers at other institutions. …

SEBS Faculty Pamela McElwee and Malin Pinsky to Begin Earth Leadership Program Training

Pamela McElwee, professor, Department of Human Ecology, and Malin Pinsky, associate professor, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, who were named Fellows of the Earth Leadership Program (ELP), will join their colleagues in the North American Cohort in an ELP training session in Racine, Wisconsin, from June 12-18. Elected in 2021, McElwee and Pinsky are among 22 academics working within a wide …

NOAA Launches New Marine Species Mapping Tool Developed in Collaboration with Rutgers

Scientists conduct a trawl survey off the coast of New England. (NOAA)

NOAA Fisheries has launched the Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal, a new tool developed in collaboration with the Global Change Ecology and Evolution Lab at Rutgers University, to better track the location and movement of marine fish in U.S. waters. An interactive website, this tool reveals that the ranges of many marine species are shifting, expanding and contracting in response to changing ocean …

Climate Change Will Reshuffle Marine Ecosystems in Unexpected Ways, Rutgers Study Finds

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Sophisticated model reveals how predator-prey relationships affect species’ ranges. Warming of the oceans due to climate change will mean fewer productive fish species to catch in the future, according to a new Rutgers study that found as temperatures warm, predator-prey interactions will prevent species from keeping up with the conditions where they could thrive. The new study, published in the journal Proceedings of …