JCNERR and Rutgers Aid in Collaborative Research Consortium Project to Manage the Barnegat and Great Bays

Aerial shot of the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JCNERR). Photo credit: Rob Auermuller, Life on the Edge Drones.

The Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JCNERR) and several partners were awarded a grant to implement the newly-established New Jersey Consortium for Resilient Communities. JCNERR is managed by Rutgers NJAES, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The project, “Barnegat Bay and Great Bays Resilience Observing Network: Tracking the Changing Environment to Inform the Management of Estuarine …

President Holloway Announces University Climate Action Plan

Members of the New Jersey State Police's Task Force 1 perform search and rescue operations in Somerville, NJ in the wake of Hurricane Ida's remnants causing record breaking flooding. Kopp said the hurricane reminded New Jersey how critical it is to both stabilize the global climate and adapt to the changes we’ve already locked in. Photo by Matt Drews

Rutgers will establish an Office of Climate Action and work to eliminate greenhouse gases before the university’s 275th anniversary. In his second address to the University Senate on Sept. 24, President Jonathan Holloway announced the university’s commitment to a Climate Action Plan and the formation of the Office of Climate Action that will lead the university’s efforts to achieve carbon neutrality by 2040. The …

Water and Industry: Rutgers Student Screening and Discussion of “Brave Blue World”

brave blue world logo

By Carol Peters During the April 13 online event, a panel of Rutgers undergraduate students from different academic backgrounds will discuss their visions for solutions to issues surrounding global water and sanitation. “What can we do to help solve the global water crisis in both our personal and professional lives?” This is the pivotal question a panel of Rutgers University-New …

“Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast

Standing dead tree trunks (a ghost forest) dominate this coastal landscape in New Jersey's Mullica River watershed. Dead and down trunks from an earlier forest that was buried in marsh sediment are exposed along the water's edge. Photo: Jennifer Walker

Higher groundwater levels from sea-level rise and increased flooding are likely the most important factors Why are “ghost forests” filled with dead trees expanding along the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast? Higher groundwater levels linked to sea-level rise and increased flooding from storm surges and very high tides are likely the most important factors, according to a Rutgers study on the …

Microplastic Sizes in Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Coastal Ocean Revealed

https://www.rutgers.edu/news/microplastic-sizes-hudson-raritan-estuary-and-coastal-ocean-revealed

Rutgers research shows stormwater could be important source of plastic pollution Rutgers scientists for the first time have pinpointed the sizes of microplastics from a highly urbanized estuarine and coastal system with numerous sources of fresh water, including the Hudson River and Raritan River. Their study of tiny pieces of plastic in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary in New Jersey and New York indicates that stormwater could be …

On the Banks of a Pristine Raritan River

Rutgers Cooperative Extension faculty member Michele Bakacs is leading an effort to study pathogens in the Raritan River, aiming to ensure the river eventually meets fishable and swimmable standards in New Jersey and becomes a resource that is cherished and celebrated.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension faculty member Michele Bakacs is leading an effort to study pathogens in the Raritan River, aiming to ensure the river eventually meets fishable and swimmable standards in New Jersey and becomes a resource that is cherished and celebrated.  By Carol Heher Peters On a sweltering day in May, Rutgers students gather on the banks of the sparkling Raritan River and …

#EOAS in the News: Ximing Guo speaks to Science Magazine about the Impact of Genomics on Aquaculture

Science Magazine interviewed EOAS faculty member Ximing Guo for the article “New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect” published Nov. 19, 2020

Science Magazine interviewed EOAS faculty member Ximing Guo for the article “New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect” published Nov. 19, 2020 Guo is a Professor at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Rutgers Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences. His primary research interests are the biology, genetics, and evolution of marine mollusks, and marine aquaculture. He is interested …

Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface

Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface

Rutgers-led study sheds light on subsurface melting of thick ice billions of years ago The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, may help resolve what’s known …

Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

A band of clouds in an atmospheric river extending from South America to the Antarctic sea ice zone on Sept. 16, 2017. Image: NASA

Warm, moist rivers of air may have continent-wide effects and influence climate change Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according to Rutgers co-authored research. Scientists studied the role of long, …

How Did Red Algae Survive in Extreme Environments?

Rutgers-led team will study algae from hot springs worldwide, including in Yellowstone National Park

Rutgers-led team will study algae from hot springs worldwide, including in Yellowstone National Park Red algae have persisted in hot springs and surrounding rocks for about 1 billion years. Now, a Rutgers-led team will investigate why these single-celled extremists have thrived in harsh environments – research that could benefit environmental cleanups and the production of biofuels and other products. Debashish Bhattacharya, …